RIP Lew Sayre Schwartz (1926-2011)

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Golden Age artist Lew Sayre Schwartz, best known as one of Bob Kane’s ghosts of the Batman comic, died over the weekend of complications from a fall, according to his son Andrew. A memorial service is planned for July.

What does GREEN LANTERN’s box-office mean for DC Entertainment?

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Meanwhile, back at the box office, GREEN LANTERN debuted at #1 with $52.6 million, less than THOR and even X-MEN: FIRST CLASS. As the Times put it: “An all-hands-on-deck effort by Warner Brothers to turn “Green Lantern” into a box office superpower fizzled over the weekend.” With a budget of a reported $300 million, dreadful reviews and a big Friday-to-Saturday drop-off, GL’s task as the advance guard for a new generation of movies based on DC characters has been made much more difficult.

2011 Joe Shuster Award winners announced

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Tweet More great Canadian cartoonists were honored Saturday, with the presentation of this year’s Joe Shuster Awards at the Calgary Comic & Entertainment Expo with hosts Ajay Fry and Teddy Wilson. The awards recognize outstanding achievements of Canadian comic book creators, publishers and retailers. And the winners are: Outstanding Comic Book Artist / Dessinateur Exceptionnel […]

RIP: Wild Man Fischer

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Musician Larry “Wild Man” Fischer died on June 16th at age 66. Challenged by severe mental illness his whole life, he was one of the earliest known examples of Outsider Music with his tuneless, shouted ditties that somehow still tapped into the joy of music and performance.

GREEN LANTERN: It’s not all bad

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If you had asked me if I had wanted to see a movie about Green Lantern, I would have been neutral, but if you had asked me if I wanted to see a movie about a giant space octopus made of fear and smoldering owl fewmets busting loose from green chains, I would have said hell yes! GREEN LANTERN is probably the most comic-book comic book movie since SPIDER-MAN. All the imagery and spirit come straight from the yellowing pages of some old comic by John Broome and Gil Kane — a boldly colored, nuance-challenged world of wonder and battle in the stars.