Dave Sim takes to Kickstarter for CEREBUS a/v something

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Notorious typewriter and fax guy Dave Sim is taking advantage of the internet’s crowdfunding abilities to run a Kickstarter to reprint High Society, one of the best story lines from CEREBUS. The project met its $6000 goal within hours of starting.

In case you are coming in fresh, Sim is the author of one of the great feats of the indie comics age: his 300-issue run on CEREBUS, a genre-defying melange of slapstick, fantasy and social commentary. The more the book had of the first two, the better it was; the more of the latter and…well…best not discussed.

New York Comic Con stuff: NYAF merges; Javits Center endangered

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A few notes about this fall’s New York Comic Con. ReedPOP has made official what everyone took for granted: the New York Anime Festival will officially fold into NYCC. Launched as a separate event just before the manga/anime implosion began, the event was soon co-located with NYCC while keeping a separate identity. This year, the programming and guests list—which are pretty extensive and popular among the fan community—will stay the same but the event itself will be part of NYCC.

How helping the Jack Kirby Museum could be the best response

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Creator/publisher Zak Sally weighs in on the Kirby Matter, and the actions he suggests are more proactive:

actually, over the course of writing this, i think i DO have an answer– not THE answer, but an idea anyway: it’s somewhat presumptive on my part, and it is NOT what “should” happen, but it falls under the category of “the least you could do”.

Haspiel on "Goodbye, impulse buy"

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This isn’t anything we haven’t covered here before, but here’s another take on the end of impulse shopping for comics, this time via Dean Haspiel. Haspiel covers the problem of shops that only order for pull lists, and suggests that there may be a substitute for impulse buying in webcomics. Linking to it also give us a chance to show this cute picture of Haspiel meeting Wallace and Gromit.

Kibbles 'n' Bits, 5/29/12: post-holiday edition

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As everyone crawls back to the mundane world—having spent the weekend bleaching and pressing now season-appropriate white clothing items—let’s round up a few things from the weekend past.

"Mysterious Cities of Gold" cartoon sequel is actually happening

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This will only excite about three dozen people, but those three dozen souls will be stricken mute with wonder and paralyzed by glee. Twenty-five years later, there is actually going to be a sequel to Mysterious Cities of Gold, the 39-episode cartoon that debuted in 1982 as a US-Franco-Japanese co-production. Using Japanese animators and DIC and Studio Pierrot writers and talent, I guess you could say this was a forebear of the current “world style” of comics and animation.

Not Comics but spectacular: 1982 BLADE RUNNER featurette

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Somehow unearthed, a 1982 convention reel from BLADE RUNNER, with young designer Syd Mead and director Ridley Scottexplaining how their invented world works, and bits of action from deleted scenes. DAMN. The bad state of the color suggest that this was sitting on a shelf somewhere for a looooong time. But no matter how bad the transfer, the candid scenes of the Blade Runner world—all set to a stylish ’70s type porno score—are priceless.

2012 NCS Award Winners; Tom Richmond nabs the Reuben

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The 2012 ‘Reuben’ awards were given out by the NCS (National Cartoonists Society) on Saturday night, although only one is actually called the Reuben. The full list of winners is here, but Tom Richmond, best known for his work on MAD Magazine won the top spot, otherwise known as THE REUBEN AWARD for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year. Richmond is a fairly prolific blogger, and has already recorded his initial thoughts:

Warren Ellis on commenting and commenters: sometimes we all feel like this

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Warren Ellis, the acerbic writer and social critic, discusses perhaps reinstating his commenting system, an idea he quickly rejects:

The Wall Street Journal's Comic Book Smack Down

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In theory, it was supposed to be a review of “Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origins of American Comics” by Christopher Irving and Seth Kushner. While Tim Marchman does reference the book a few times in his review of the book for the Wall Street Journal, it’s really more of a rant about the failure of the mainstream direct market to capitalize on the popularity of comic book movies. With the fervor you normally expect from a theater critic, Marchman proceeds to rip all sorts of people a new one. And, on the side of restraint, he does stop just short of calling the community inbred.

Avengers Closing In on #3 Film All-Time

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Even with Men In Black III (technically, another Marvel movie since Marvel acquired Malibu) taking over the top spot, Avengers is holding up very well with 4-day weekend haul estimated at $46,878,000. It only lost 331 theaters and it’s still rolling along.

Memorial Day 2012

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Secret Identities : Who is What, and Does It Matter?

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All characters have characteristics. Do some matter more than others?

Checking In on the Extreme Relaunch / Liefeldverse

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With the recent release of Youngblood #71, the relaunch of Rob Liefeld’s Extreme universe is in full swing. I looked at the amazing Prophet and surprising Glory when they came out. Now it’s time for the rest of the batch.

Gerade Links: My Train Of Thought Goes Off The Rails

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A brief conversation with a co-worker starts with Archie and ends with Gary Owens, with cameos by Scooby-Doo and Batman! (No Kevin Bacon, alas.) Read on to discover the crazy linkage!

Digital Exclusives — The Direct Market All Over Again… But Only For Single Issues

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In recent weeks, we’ve been seeing the exclusivity monster poke it’s head up on the digital platform. Marvel’s exclusive with Comixology. Valiant is exclusive with Comixology. DC might as well be exclusive with Comixology. But, for the most part, there appears to be a catch: the digital exclusives seem to be just for the monthly editions. Single issues if you prefer.