Amazon reveals secrets of EARTH ONE and MORE OGNs for DC

While DC reps remained mum about the price and format of the Earth One OGNs, they announced last week — such elements being important clues to the intended audience of said projects — Amazon was not as tightlipped, and the listing for EARTH ONE: SUPERMAN by JMS and Shane Davis reveals that it will be 128 pages for $19.99. JOKER-sized, as Robot 6 points out.

Collected Editions also runs the numbers and with a discount, an OGN would run you less than six issues of a $3.99 comic. THE JOKER is selling for $13.50 on Amazon right now.

Evidently, DC sees real growth potential in OGNs, as IGN learned that several licensed comics would be moving to that format, namely the WARCRAFT series, which started out gangbusters but fell prey to standard attrition as time went on.

Blizzard’s fantasy and futuristic universes are about to get shaken up, courtesy of a comic book revamp by DC’s Wildstorm Comics. Today the publisher announced it intends to refocus its efforts on a series of original graphic novels, cancelling its current ongoing series endeavors for both franchises.

“While WildStorm and Blizzard loved the stories being told in the regular monthly comic-book series, we decided that the graphic novel would be a more suitable medium for the tales we wanted to tell next,” said Hank Kanalz, VP & General Manager of Wildstorm. “The larger format will give our artists and storytellers more room to explore Blizzard’s rich, varied worlds and flesh out the characters that inhabit these places.”


WELL NOW. The plot thickens. The WARCRAFT issue currently on sale will be the last pamphlet; details of the book relaunch are forthcoming.

A couple of things strike us about all of this. Licensed, manga-sized books have sold pretty well at other publishers so this is surely a viable format. However those were in B&W and manga-sized, a proven formula. A $20 hardcover is another matter. The net effect of all these moves is to spotlight an implied doubt over the continued viability of the floppy at DC — we’ve heard a few rumblings that more and more Vertigo projects will be going straight to the trade, as well, and looking at the numbers that Vertigo and Wildstorm periodicals are selling, it makes sense to try another format.

In a larger sense, DC has been in a tiring holding pattern ever since 10 Days That Shook The World™. Until the new publisher or publisher/president lineup is announced, everything is on hold. That’s one-third of the whole year without forward motion, which can’t be pleasant for a lot of people. BUT jungle drums are saying there will be a publisher announcement early in 2010–which could be in the nick of time.

Related: Marc-Oliver has a summary of Joe Q’s continued resistance to the OGN:

[F]rom the financial standpoint of a commercial artist, if I’m looking for a way to maximize my time versus how much money I make versus how much exposure I get—an OGN doesn’t make sense. […] I could do a year’s worth of work and put it out as one graphic novel, and I’ll be on the stands in perpetuity (if it’s good) but promoted for really only one month. […] And that’ll boost my career for that month. The book will come out and sell to fewer people because I’ve had to put something like a $40 price point on it. […] And let’s not forget, what if the OGN isn’t all that good?


Again, we can certainly understand how the numbers run this way at Marvel but…are there NO STORIES IN THE WORLD OF MARVEL that could best be told in one shot? Is that idea completely alien to everything about the way Marvel works?

Developing.

Comments

  1. Re: Joe Quesada and Blizzard: Halo. 9780785123729

    An original hardcover graphic novel, priced at $25, based on a video game, with mostly unknown names attached. Hugely successful. (Still selling ONLY in hardcover, THREE years after it was originally published.)

    Now, you publish that as a four-issue miniseries, it might sell 10 – 15,000 an issue, but then the hardcover comes out, and the sales will be smaller. (“Eh… I read the comic, it wasn’t that great… I can download the scans… $25 for a reprint…? Yawn…”)

    “And let’s not forget, what if the OGN isn’t all that good?”
    Then WHY THE FREAKIN’ HELL are you wasting YOUR time and money printing… Oh. Right. Editors don’t edit books anymore… they’re traffic cops and facilitators…

    As for price, 128 pages/6 issues (two volumes a year) = 21 pages = comic book. $19.99/6 issues = $3.33 an issue. DC saves money on five covers not commissioned and not printed on glossy paper, returns from newsagents, and possibly on labor. (Since this is a book, DC could use the publishing model of advances and royalties, paying the letterer, etc. a flat fee.) DC could even use Top Shelf’s successful model used with “Lost Girls”… the first printing is shipped to the Direct Market, on a non-returnable basis, and pays the cost of the second printing which is shipped to the book market a few weeks later. (The copy of Lost Girls I bought at B&N was a third printing, which shipped in December. The book premiered at SPX in September.)

    Curiously, Books In Print has no record yet of the Superman title, which means that Random House has not yet released the data to bookstores and other bibliographic entities. Amazon jumped the gun, most likely, which might have repercussions…

    And if serialization is such a great model, why aren’t regular prose publishers using it? Stephen King proved it worked with Green Mile… Or is a serialized book just a serialized novel, but in bigger chunks?

    I rarely bought back issues of ANY series I read back in the 80s, before everything was collected. Tales of the Beanworld, Concrete, Marvel Tales. Collected trades encourage back issue buying, because the back issues are cheaply and easily available in a convenient trade collection! Which is more money for the publisher, because readers are buying the BACKLIST, which you can REPRINT and RAISE the cover price over time, instead of a back issue, which the publisher can’t reprint. You make it easier for the reader to enter your universe, you make it easier for him to explore that universe by BUYING other series. A series which exists ONLY in book form is easier to start and enjoy than a series which exists as a periodical.

    In other words, try collecting the back issues of Sandman. Compare that to buying the back issues in trade paperbacks. Which is easier and cheaper?

  2. single issue, traditional comic format, comic magazine; so many ways to say it rather than this highbrow bullshit pamphlet or floppies. I sell comic books and I do it pretty darn well. I don’t order or sell @#$%# pamphlets. Denigrating the format does nothing but help kill it.

  3. RDaggle says:

    “the WARCRAFT series, which started out gangbusters but fell prey to standard attrition as time went on.”

    Exactly.

    Standard attrition, because unlike the hardcore comic fan, the typical reader wants an ENDING. They want a good 200-page book that tells a complete story. They are happy to wait a year for the next book in a series which tells a new story with the characters.

    The comic book industry seems so married to the serial/soap opera style that they don’t see this (or can’t make the numbers work somehow.)

    Superman, Batman, Spider-man, Wolverine: How can we miss you if you never leave?

  4. JamesF says:

    I personally like the implication in Joey Q’s statement that basically doing floppies allow them to put out the material that they don’t feel can support an OGN (i.e. that “isn’t that good”) and yet still make some money. Sadly he’s got a point since people are buying the floppies at times regardless of the quality of the content.

  5. Torsten: This is a big field with all kinds of examples, but in my experience, collected editions of serialized superhero comics tend to sell better than original graphic novels with equivalent creative teams. This is because (a) there’s already word of mouth about the book and (b) the collections are usually thicker packages for a lower price. You’re assuming a very negative reaction to the HALO book, which is stacking the deck to begin with. Again in my experience, books that people don’t like, don’t sell in any format; books people like, tend to sell in multiple formats.

    I don’t know the context of Joe’s quote, but I take it to mean that, if a monthly book isn’t coming together creatively — which happens to the best of us, at every level of the field — you can shift gears and make changes on the fly, up to and including cancellation. That’s harder to do if your business model requires you to save up 120 or 160 pages and publish it all at once.

    No, serialization isn’t a great model for book publishers. It’s not too hot for movies, either. It works pretty well for TV, though. Why would we want all media to resemble each other?

    And regarding your SANDMAN example: Of course the collections are the editions that remain in print, and are easier to find, years down the line. Does that mean SANDMAN shouldn’t have been serialized?

    I love trade paperbacks and hardcovers…really, I do. But there’s nothing wrong with serialization either. It doesn’t work very well for art comics and indies, anymore; but for DC and Marvel, it’s still part of the fun.

  6. Quesada’s reasoning is archaic. The market wants what it wants and if you can’t make a living producing one book and 128 pages or whatever a year, the problem is not the market. The problem is your slow production. If you can produce enough pages to get 2 or 3 128 page OGNs on the shelf a year, you’d probably do just fine.

  7. Nate Horn says:

    I think all this talk of books (OGNs or otherwise) *really* misses the point. The future lies in digital copies. The refusal to digitize books when they’re new is just chopping the future of Marvel’s and DC’s sales off at the knees.

  8. “And if serialization is such a great model, why aren’t regular prose publishers using it? Stephen King proved it worked with Green Mile… Or is a serialized book just a serialized novel, but in bigger chunks?”

    There are literally hundreds of novel series that have continuing storylines: Sci-fi and fantasy, of course; mysteries, even chick-lit have plot-lines that evolve over the course of several books. I believe that some publishers even mandate it when they sign some authors to multi-book contracts.

    This is especially true for licensed books: Star Trek, Forgotten Realms, Buffy, the aforementioned Warcraft… it’s not uncommon for licensed books to be broken down into storyarcs that are part of the title or cover dress.

  9. The Beat writes, “The net effect of all these moves is to spotlight an implied doubt over the continued viability of the floppy at DC — we’ve heard a few rumblings that more and more Vertigo projects will be going straight to the trade …”

    We’re still a long way from the death of the monthly comic, but bottom line I think there are some series that will sell better as collections than as individual issues. Warcraft and the rumored Vertigo projects are case in point.

    I’ve long thought DC should do the same with a fan-favorite series like Manhunter — take six unreleased issues-worth, tie the last issue into a forthcoming DC event, and release it all as an in-continuity graphic novel. If it succeeds, make it, like the Earth One books, a twice yearly event. The new second features do seem to me, in essence, a way to serially run a story that will spend most of its life as a collected paperback.

    I could foresee crossovers released the same way, with possibly less “event fatigue” — one big Blackest Night graphic novel comes out the first week of the month, and then all the DC titles that month tie back to the graphic novel.

    Interesting times …

  10. The Beat says:

    Calum: I realized as I was typing that I had vowed to ban pamphlet and floppy in my own writing but…I guess I couldn’t hep myself.

    What Wesley Smith said. A 22-page dose is NOT the norm in licensed publishing any more, and hasn’t been for a looong time.

    Stuart: I would somewhat agree with you, but there is no denying that the past decade has seen the rise of a non-Wednesday crowd that will buy stories in a larger, more expensive format. The Satisfying Chunk strikes again.

    Perhaps the change in thinking here is that comics are not EITHER TV or Movies. They are both. There are plenty of very successful licensed comics out there that couldn’t possibly sell in a periodical form.

  11. Is it just me or does Marvel seem unable to acknowledge any possible readership that isn’t part of the Direct Market? Quesada’s statements just seem kind of misguided given that DC will have a line of OGNs for all of its major imprints at some point in the near future.

  12. Not to be the guy who comes in to plug my own stuff (though I feel like I do that a lot here! Ugh!), but the brief Joe quote above came from a Cup O Joe column from earlier this week:

    http://comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=24069

    I think anyone interested in getting Joe’s position would do well to read the whole exchange. He does go into the question of whether sticking to serialized comics hampers the creative possibilities and argues that Marvel has been more than willing to add pages or issues as creators need to complete a story the way they want, which is true, and I know that they’ve published some one-off stories in the past decade which may not be full OGNs, but do tell a story beginning to end (the “The End” stories come to mind as do the Jenkins/Rivera “Mythos” books).

    And I’m not saying that Joe and Marvel are 100% right in their adherence to the serialized format, but I certainly think there’s more room for debate here than some suppose.

    For one, a lot of these superhero comics in question work very well from a story standpoint as serial fiction, whether issue to issue or trade to trade. And even within the issues, 22 pages does not necessarily mean that what should be 40-page chunk of story gets screwed over. Ed Brubaker’s been telling certain serial stories in the form of smaller 6 to 8 page vignettes/scenes/whatever you want to call them for years (Catwoman and Cap come to mind) and those books work very well as stand alone comics.

    From the money side of things, I think it’s safe to say that all DM genre publishers have found a way to make good money off of serializing and then collecting while the same hasn’t been proven for OGNs yet (note the “yet”!). DC certainly has done some work in this area, but they seem to have more capital to play with out the gate, and even considering that I don’t think these Earth-One books were greenlit lightly.

    Also: Joe spoke to the metrics of OGNs from the view of a working artist rather than a publisher, and he makes an interesting point that from the position that many people drawing American comics find themselves in, it probably does make more sense to serialize stuff. Look at that Joker OGN DC put out. Lee Bermejo did a great job and impressed a lot of people, but he had that one book and a few Stand covers out over the past year or so. It’s probably the same amount of pages as someone like Steve McNiven produces, but McNiven I think is going to be in the minds of both readers and editors hiring folks because his name is on the shelves several times each quarter. Those ideas definitely affect creators in terms of what they pitch and what jobs they chase, and right now I’d put good money on the idea that most creators feel more comfortable sticking with the monthly grind as opposed to the yearly chunk – at least in that segment of the market.

  13. One thing I’ve been wondering in the midst of the whole price-raising/going-to-OGN argument: whatever happened to prestige format comics? DC and Marvel both used to put out a TON of the things, which were 48 pages of (usually standalone or two-part) story with no ads and a cardstock cover, they charged $5.99 for them (at a time when comics were $1.99), they sold a boatload, and they stayed on the backlist rather than disappearing like a standard periodical. I can’t think of anything Marvel has released this way in years, and DC has done it with a couple Sam Kieth projects (Batman vs. Lobo and the current Lobo series with Anthrax’s Scott Ian) but otherwise, nothing. Of course, 48 pages might be a rough sell in the bookstore market but the format was clearly successful for the Big Two at one point of they wouldn’t have published so darn many of them.

  14. Henrik J says:

    JamesE : So if a comic is not as good as the very best comics every created it shouldnt be published?

    I dont get why so many people are in a rush to misunderstand everything Joe Quesada writes.

  15. When I used my Sandman example, I should have given it historical context:

    As a new reader (started collecting in 1984), I avoided Sandman. My retailer recommended it. CBG recommended every issue. But it looked like a horror comic (and it is), and I avoided such things. Then DC published the Orpheus special, promoted the trade collections, and even offered a nice slipcase. I bought the Special, got hooked, bought the three trades, then had to acquire the uncollected issues (#21-31), a hunt which took me from Omaha, across Iowa, and into Minnesota. The most expensive issue cost me $8 at the time.

    And, yes, Sandman would probably have been a much better series if the volumes had been original graphic novels, as the creative team would have had more time to produce the stories, instead of knuckling under the straight-jacket of 22-pages-a-month-every-month.

    As for the Quesada quality quote… A book editor, if he or she is doing his or her job, is EDITING the various drafts of the story so that it is perfect BEFORE publication. That means hiring the right people to do the job correctly. The book may then fail (as many do), but the storytelling is usually solid.

    I hope DC maintains the tight editing of their original hardcover graphic novels. They sell VERY well (Joker, Endless Nights, 1001 Nights). JMS, who once scripted a five-year-long television miniseries (with a little help from Neil Gaiman, and proved that finite series on television would work), a 24-issue comics miniseries, and an interesting run of Spider-Man, seems well suited for this project.

    As with past projects (Endless Nights, Peter & Max), DC will most likely offer promotional material to entice readers, probably as previews in the back of the periodical comics. Tying it into FCBD would have been better, but the timing is off.

    Oh, that reminds me… Tales of the Beanworld, Volume 3 was just printed as an OGN… gotta pick up a copy. Although, if it hits the NY Times bestseller list like the other volumes, I can get it for 50% off… Wahoolazuma!

  16. Marcopolo says:

    Why exactly is “pamphlet” considered a derogatory term? I can understand why people object to “floppy”, which clearly does carry a negative implication, but what’s wrong with “pamphlet”?

    A short publication, bound with staples, without a rigid cover is called a pamphlet when it contains only text. I really don’t get the objection to calling the exact same format a pamphlet when it also contains pictures.

    I don’t have an axe to grind on this, by the way. I buy quite a few comics in the monthly form. I also sometimes buy text-only pamphlets. It’s only since I started reading about comics online that I discovered that some people regarded the term as derogatory.

  17. Because there’s a percieved sneer attached to the word. I’m not sure it really is indicative of a pince-nez, dismissive attitude to certain sorts of comics, but we all bring our prejudices to the table like salt cellars, right?

    Some people might see the word as implying that the content is as thin and worthless as the name implies, but there’s a world of difference between even the worst comic and, say, an actual pamphlet (advertising an event or service).

    I prefer “magazine-format comic” (yuk), because – well, shit, even I think the word “pamphlet” is a little dismissive. But it’s mostly because I percieve it to be an Ellisism. And while that’s fine for him, it ain’t fer me.

    //Oo/\

  18. I guess only Neil and his collaborators could tell us whether they’d rather have done SANDMAN in larger chunks to begin with. I’m of the general opinion, having edited both comics and books, that there’s a powerful energy to a monthly, serialized comic book when it’s clicking on all cylinders. It IS definitely a punishing pace, and not for all creators. But I’m not ready to throw it out the window. I’ve also seen creators who will produce on a monthly basis, energized by the deadlines and (this is not a small thing) by the lure of seeing their work appear soon after they’ve finished it — but who slump and slow to a crawl when faced with a hundred-plus pages. One size doesn’t fit all, I guess.

    As for book editing, where I started out: There are such a variety of situations there — buy full manuscript that needs work; buy full manuscript that’s publishable almost as is; buy outline and sample that turns out fine; buy outline & sample that turns into a disaster; etc. — that you can definitely get surprises there, too. In either field, sometimes you roll the dice.

  19. I thought Cap Reborn was a perfect opportunity for Marvel to enter the OGN market – it would’ve paid off the mainstream press coverage of his ‘death’ for casual readers, and it’s in-continuity, so there would’ve been incentive for the regulars to make the extra purchase.

  20. Fun Gnome says:

    I think DC should release the Hardcover and Softcover at the same time and let people choose. I know why they don’t, but as a consumer, I’m not jumping at the chance to spend $20 in one go.

    “JMS, who once scripted a five-year-long television miniseries (with a little help from Neil Gaiman)”

    He wrote one episode.

    There is no solitary correct format for these stories. All formats should be explored–monthly comic, OGN, Digital, and those yet to be discovered. Quesada has a valid point. DC is smart to try something new and different. Longbox will be a welcome alternative. Adding “back-matter” is a good incentive for purchasing monthly comics, but not all comics should have it. Diversity is a good thing, and hopefully there are smart people at these comics publishers which understand that. I believe there are, and that means they’re not trying to take your beloved comic books away or completely ignoring digital distribution or any other possibility just because it’s not all happening RIGHT NOW.

    Give them a chance.

  21. jacob lyon goddard says:

    surprise surprise, marvel is a big backwards thinking grindhouse company that likes to pretend like it’s still 1966.
    this isn’t news, it’s beating a dead horse.

    to be perfectly honest, a small part of me is happy that some people are keeping the classic formula alive; even if they are doing work that i’ll never buy.

  22. Kate Fitzsimons says:

    Oh, the pamphlet and the novel should be friends
    Oh, the pamphlet and the novel should be friends
    One type keeps its readers hooked, the other type is neatly booked
    But that’s no reason why they cain’t be friends…

  23. Wraith says:

    3 quick points.

    1. Marvel has done OGN before. THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN MARVEL,NEW MUTANTS,X-MEN: GOD LOVES,MAN KILLS,SUPER BOXERS,WOLF PACK,VOID INDIGO,ELEKTRA LIVES,FUTURIANS,SHE-HULK,DAZZLER THE MOVIE, STARSLAMMERS,DREADSTAR,KILLRAVEN,and PUNISHER; ASSASSINS GUILD were all ORIGINAL GRAPHIC NOVELS. The difference between these OGN and what DC is doing with the EARTH ONE OGN series, is that the Marvel OGN were all stand alone stories (and in some cases “out of continuity” or creator owned stories). Also, with the exception of ELEKTRA LIVES, all of those Marvel OGN were affordable soft covers. IMO, this is the type of model DC should use if they want to do a line of OGN.

    2. Those elitist fans,creators,and editors who want the Big 2 to switch to the OGN format reminds me of those elitist from the 80’s who wanted all comics to switch to the “more mature” baxter paper format during the 80’s. And we all know how that turned out.

    3. Anyone elitist fans,creators,or editors who refer to comic books as “pamphlets” or “floppies” deserves to be ridiculed and slapped upside the head.

  24. Chris Anderson says:

    Monthly comics are pamphlets and floppies. Any one who has a problem with that is being pretentious.

  25. I tend to think the move by DC toward OGNs for some types of content is a smart one. As a reader, more complex stories like SANDMAN are much more satisfying in 100+ page chunks. However, I wonder what happens to the idea of continuity if that format take off.

    I mean, Marvel-style inter-title continuity is highly tied to the presumption that the various books are all being released in the same month. The classic example being an event in THOR causing snow and every Marvel title released that month featuring fresh snowfall.

    But, with OGNs it is impossible to know what relationship one series has to another. Not that big a deal for DC, but Marvel has a lot invested in the illusion of a coherent shared universe.

  26. Joe’s right.

    It doesn’t hurt DC to try something new, I’ll be the first one in line to buy copes of these books, but clearly no one on this board knows anything about ad sales. Or the benefit of selling something seven times instead of once.

    If you can read a Charles Dickens “novel” 160 years after it was first serialized and not notice anything, you’ll be safe picking up a “trade paperback”. I promise.

  27. Charles Knight says:

    I don’t see the problem with Pamphlets either.

    “If you can read a Charles Dickens “novel” 160 years after it was first serialized and not notice anything, you’ll be safe picking up a “trade paperback”. I promise.”

    Well, except for the fact that the TPB might be chock full of incoherent twists that makes no sense to anyone who hasn’t read 20 years worth of back issues. The point here is that the Earth-one OGNs should not have that problem.

  28. ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN VOLUME ONE doesn’t have that problem, either. Nothing against Earth-One; they sound like cool books. But the format doesn’t determine quality.

    I liked Dickens until he jumped the shark with those Christmas ghosts. Totally violated the rules of the universe he’d established.

  29. Charles Knight says:

    “ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN VOLUME ONE doesn’t have that problem, either. Nothing against Earth-One; they sound like cool books. But the format doesn’t determine quality.”

    I take that point but the impression was that we were talking about TPBs in general, so that Supergirl vol.15 is as accessible as Earth one is suppose to be and nobody buys that.

  30. Alan Coil says:

    “Monthly comics are pamphlets and floppies.” says the people who wish to be elitists.

    They’re comic books. Own the truth, don’t try to obscure it.

  31. I like that Dickens is being used as an example of something that isn’t “chock full of incoherent twists” – now that’s comedy! :-)

    Brian Hibbs had a great perspective on this very issue today-
    http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=24104

  32. “Also, with the exception of ELEKTRA LIVES, all of those Marvel OGN were affordable soft covers.”

    Wrong. Marvel used to put out a lot of hardcover OGN’s too. I can think of THE PUNISHER: RETURN TO BIG NOTHING, THE PUNISHER: KINGDOM GONE, and SPIDER-MAN: SPIRITS OF THE EARTH off the top of my head. Marvel also did HALO OGN in hardcover, and that was only about three years ago.

  33. The Beat says:

    I got your Marvel OGN right here!

  34. Synsidar says:

    One major benefit of a complete story, whether it’s an OGN or a prose vignette, is the ending. The ending forces a writer to say what the story’s about, what the point of creating/using those particular characters in that particular setting was. If he can’t say what the story’s about — if the point of the story was to waste people’s time and money having characters doing nothing of consequence — he’ll use the ending to promote another story with the implicit promise that in this story, something important will happen.

    MARVEL DIVAS happens to be an excellent example of how bad “slice of life” stories can be. At best, the individual issues were slightly diverting; collected, the sum of the issues is zero, because nothing worth remembering happened to any of the heroines. Fans of the characters or Marvel generally don’t need to know about the miniseries’ existence.

    The point of continuity in the Marvel universe historically has been to have the monthly series interact. In OGNs, continuity could be much looser, with references to other characters and events being much more general, and still work.

    SRS

  35. Charles Knight says:

    “One major benefit of a complete story, whether it’s an OGN or a prose vignette, is the ending. The ending forces a writer to say what the story’s about, what the point of creating/using those particular characters in that particular setting was. ”

    It’s interesting you mention that, JMS notes that:

    “It’s about 128 pages, and the thing about moving out of the 22-page format is that you don’t have to be constantly moving toward a cliffhanger every 22 pages.

    You can structure the book as you would any novel: introduction, rising action, complication, climax and denouement. I want this to feel like what it is: a novel, which will be attractive both to fans and casual readers.”

  36. Jason says:

    But by not releasing this as periodicals first, theyre forcing retailers to have to compete with amazon

  37. Jason says:

    “Quesada’s reasoning is archaic. The market wants what it wants and if you can’t make a living producing one book and 128 pages or whatever a year, the problem is not the market. The problem is your slow production. If you can produce enough pages to get 2 or 3 128 page OGNs on the shelf a year, you’d probably do just fine.”

    What about the part of the market that still wants regular comics and cant afford to plop down twenty or thirty dollars at once on something.

    Marvel does give the market what it wants. The finished product of a OGN and collected hardcover is basically the same thing. Why do you think theres so many hardcovers now than there was ten or even 5 years ago?

    Why is it wise for dc to ignore a large segment of the market and give a pretty big blow to comic retailer by just releasing in periodical format first??

    Why is an OGN a more valid art form than a single comic book that it’s worth pissing a whole stream of revenue away?

    Joe Q is right, let the fans choose which format they want.

  38. Charles Knight says:

    “But by not releasing this as periodicals first, theyre forcing retailers to have to compete with amazon”

    Yes and?

  39. Jason says:

    so basically you’re okay to DC saying F YOU to comic shops

  40. Wraith says:

    “Also, with the exception of ELEKTRA LIVES, all of those Marvel OGN were affordable soft covers.”

    “Wrong. Marvel used to put out a lot of hardcover OGN’s too. I can think of THE PUNISHER: RETURN TO BIG NOTHING, THE PUNISHER: KINGDOM GONE, and SPIDER-MAN: SPIRITS OF THE EARTH off the top of my head. Marvel also did HALO OGN in hardcover, and that was only about three years ago.”

    ________________________________________

    You are absolutely right. However, I was speaking specifically about the OGN titles I listed in my post, NOT all Marvel OGN.

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