Barefoot Gen examined

201102220402 Barefoot Gen examined

Before MAUS proved that US comics could take on the most serious subjects with intelligence and dignity, the Japanese were there first. BAREFOOT GEN took on another World War II horror — the bombing of Hiroshima — with 10 harrowing volumes, based on the real life experiences of Keiji Nakazawa. The series — published in 6 volumes in the US by Last Gasp — is the subject of this month’s Manga Movable Feast, hosted at A Life in Panels, but also summarized by Ed Sizemore who reviews the series at Manga Worth Reading:

The greatest impression one gets reading all ten volumes is one of unrelenting sorrow. There is no bright light, just endless tunnel. The tragedy begins when Gen sees his father, sister, and younger brother pinned under the rubble of their home. He and his eight-month-pregnant mother struggle to get them out, but can’t. They beg for help from people passing by and are ignored. The debris catches fire, and he watches as his family is burned to death.


This MMF provides a good introduction to one of the most important comics series ever published, grim as it may be, and includes a comparison to Grave of the Fireflies (the anime about the same events), a visit to the Hiroshima Peace Museum, a comparison to THE DRIFTING CLASSROOM, and other topics.

Nakazawa, 71, has recently been battling lung cancer – it’s amazing that he has survived so much but he plans to fight on.

Comments

  1. Julián Gutiérrez says:

    Actually, Grave of the Fireflies takes place during the firebombings of Kobe

  2. Actually you can get all 10 books in the USA, but BFG #1 is out of print, so it is very hard to find the full series anymore. Last Gasp printed them as all 10 books, check out their site you will see.

  3. Jason B. says:

    Based upon the title “Breaking Down Borders” for a split-second I thought someone had already created a comic book detailing the collapse of the Borders bookstore chain.
    Man, I need more coffee before I start surfing the web.

  4. I’ve read the entire series and it is a fantastic story. It’s very educational and probably best read one volume at a time with some space in between them.

  5. Ali T. Kokmen says:

    Nakazawa also did an autobiographical comic called I SAW IT, the true story of his experiences living after the Hiroshima bombing that would inform the story of Barefoot Gen. Reading I SAW IT was the first time I wept while reading a comic book.

  6. Dan,

    Last Gasp has announced on Twitter that they have just completed another print run of volume 1. As soon as they get the books from the printer they will be forwarded to Amazon and other retail outlets.

Speak Your Mind

*