Dick Briefer’s FRANKENSTEIN

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frankenstein32p1 Dick Briefers FRANKENSTEIN
Recently, Tom Spurgeon pointed to the existence of a recent collection of Dick Briefer’s Frankenstein comics. We confess to owning no Briefer comics ourselves, but the bits of his work we’ve seen over the years — most recently in ART OUT OF TIME — have always been very enjoyable. The strip started out as a horror book, but later evolved into a more humorous effort, as the creature got involved in various zany adventures.

To get into the Halloween spirit, a Comics Journal board thread discussing the reprint leads us to this complete scary Briefer story online. Enjoy.

Comments

  1. peter bangs says:

    My first briefer story and it was all too brief.

  2. Matthew Jent says:

    I remember that Frankenstein face! They mention it in the TCJ thread, but some Briefer strips (and apparently some drawn-in-the-style-of-Briefer strips) ran in CRACKED magazine in the late 80’s. I started looking through the website, and I remember that pointy chin and too-high nose.

    I love that picture of Frankenstein fighting the alligator.

  3. Primate says:

    Read the whole book via your link, Heidi. The melting mannequin made my lower lip tremble…

  4. John Castro says:

    In the 1940s in Prize Comics (I am unsure if the title was part of the Fawcett stable (my best guess) or DC’s or an independent; I do know Stan Lee had NOTHING to do with it.), Briefer treated the monster as a comedic character, friendly and uninterested in harming a soul. The monster was monstrous only in size.
    When the comic book sea changes occurred after WWII, there was, for one, a wave of new mystery, magic and horror titles. Even Captain America briefly became a fighter against black magic! (After fighting real monsters (the Nazis) all through the war.)
    Briefer apparently went with the flow and retooled his character to be more like the original. I must say I like the monster when he’s a monster better.

  5. John Castro says:

    In the 1940s in Prize Comics (I am unsure if the title was part of the Fawcett stable (my best guess) or DC’s or an independent; I do know Stan Lee had NOTHING to do with it.), Briefer treated the monster as a comedic character, friendly and uninterested in harming a soul. The monster was monstrous only in size.
    When the comic book sea changes occurred after WWII, there was, for one, a wave of new mystery, magic and horror titles. Even Captain America briefly became a fighter against black magic! (After fighting real monsters (the Nazis) all through the war.)
    Briefer apparently went with the flow and retooled his character to be more like the original. I must say I like the monster when he’s a monster better.

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