Geoff Johns Explains Trinity War

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DC have posted a video explaining the basic premise of their big Justice League crossover Trinity War, as detailed by writer Geoff Johns. And it’s really rather nifty. Follow the jump to take a look at the vid, which is wonderfully animated.

 

A really great idea from DC, this – a short video for readers to watch, which sets up the premise neatly and creates a new jump-on point for anyone. Despite what you might think about the storyline, at least this video gives you an easy-to-follow guide to what’s happening. Events and crossovers are designed to bring in new readers — the more a company does to explain and set up a storyline for ANYBODY to try out, the more people will be tempted to give it a try. Simple!

Comments

  1. Roberto Briceno says:

    WOW!! I could really care less about this event by same old, same old event writer. How boring.

    LOOK!!! IMAGE and other indy publishers are producing books that are story driven and not editorial driven event books!!!

  2. Can someone sum up TW in ten words or so?

    Anything more, and it’s too much bother.

  3. David says:

    Awww, it’s like listening to a kid playing with his action figures.

  4. Jeff Trexler says:

    In a shocking role reversal, Superman has become the judgmental father and Batman, the merciful Son. Wonder Woman remains the Holy Spirit, symbolizing the engrained sexist culture that renders even the most powerful women invisible.

    They fight. Sun goes dark, moon turns red, life goes on.

  5. Silly but True says:

    Perhaps this is a bit premature, but should we call this the “Morrison Effect?” That is, the need to explain a major comic event, because the event actually fails to do so.

    However crappy this might be, I at least have faith that a wholly non-intuitive major plot or main antagonist won’t be revealed in an obscure, loosely-branded two-shot series.

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