High Society negatives go up in flames

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201208271133 High Society negatives go up in flames

Very sad news. Even as a recent Kickstarter campaign had raised money for a new digital edition of Dave Sim’s seminal “High Society” storyline in CEREBUS, in a horrible stroke of irony, all of those negatives and all the digital scans made from them have gone up in flames, as the home of Sandeep Atwal burned to the ground. Sim updated the situation on the Moment of Cerebus page:

“Dave Sim, here: Just thought everyone should know: Fisher came over today and asked if I had heard from Sandeep. No, I hadn’t. Hands me today’s Record. Front page: Sandeep’s place — and the buildings on either side of him — were gutted by fire yesterday afternoon. He got out in one piece but with nothing but the clothes on his back and his wallet (he had been in the shower and a cop showed up at the door: “You have the leave. Now”) The whole place went up in about five minutes.

All of the negatives for High Society were destroyed as well as the 11×17 scanner and the new negative scanner. No insurance. So, I thought I’d better let everyone know that we’re definitely not on track for the September 12 launch at this point.

I don’t expect that I’ll hear from Sandeep for at least a few days — he’s staying with friends and obviously has a lot more important things to think about than High Society Digital.

Okay — gotta run to make my 3:00 prayer. Please feel free to relay this to anyone you think should know. Particularly people who are waiting on High Society Digital.

While the loss of the negatives is sad, thankfully there was no loss of life. A donation button has been set up for Atwal, who was Aardvark-Vanaheim’s communications manager, and helped keep Sim connected to the world digitally.

In one final Dave Sim note, he’s (as far as we know) still doing a virtual press conference over at the Moment of Cerebus and would like to answer questions from other sites. So if you have a question for Dave Sim, post it in the comments and we’ll send it over.

Comments

  1. Gail Simone says:

    Oh, good lord.

    I’m so sorry to hear of Sandeep’s home, glad he’s alive and unharmed.

    But the loss of those negatives is horrifying.
    Are they replaceable, do we know?

    The Cerebus volumes are a treasure to our industry, some of the best and most important comics ever made.

    PLEASE don’t let this mean they can’t be replaced.

  2. This is horribly tragic. Condolences to Sandeep — we’re pulling for you!

  3. Oliver Simonsen Suggested I post this here. I was the one running the Kickstarter Campaign for Dave – I’m selling CEREBUS related items at auction at the link below. All proceeds are going towards Sandeep Atwal to help him rebuild his life. Thanks!

    http://www.ebay.com/sch/tatteredjeans42/m.html?item=221115921557&sspagename=STRK%3AMESELX%3AIT&rt=nc&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649&_trksid=p4340.l2562

  4. allenrubinstein says:

    If the negatives have burned up, can’t the original art be used to make new ones? That presumes that they all haven’t been sold off. Maybe he could put out a call for any owners of original art to volunteer their use.

    These are so valuable, why don’t artists/publishers make backups in case of this kind of unfortunate thing? It can’t be the first fire to involved negatives.

  5. Allen – the original art can be used to make new negatives, in the case where they had the original art, the kickstarter team used that. I heard from Sandeep this weekend and he had this to say about the progress of the scanning: “issues 26-40 were scanned and uploaded to George’s server,leaving issues 41-50. Of those, Dave has about half of the original art, so we’re probably looking at about 100 negatives lost that weren’t scanned.” So if one has original art from those issues, please see this page about how one can help: http://thecerebusartcollection.com/index3.html

  6. Brian Spence says:

    Wow, huge news. As much as Sim’s mental state ruined the end or Cerebus, High Society remains an important work in comics. Definitely one of my favorites. It showed Sim coming into his own and really breaking new ground in how comics are made. That stuff blew my mind as a teenager. Hope it can be salvaged.

  7. Hi. I have a question to ask Dave as per the “Ask Dave Any Question from this web-site” HARDTalk tour on the MOMENTofCEREBUS web-site.

    Given the 35 years since Cerebus #1 first came out and your length of time in the comics’ industry and field, do you have any thoughts and opinions on the current state of the industry? Is it as dire as it seems, especially when someone like yourself who has managed to successfully self-publish 300 issues and kept 16 graphic novels in print and always seemed to have his finger on the pulse of the industry has to end 2 bi-monthly comics?

  8. Sorry for the second post but someone posted the same question and Dave answered it for the first question on the tour!
    http://momentofcerebus.blogspot.ca/2012/09/hardtalk-virtual-tour-1.html?m=1

    So my other question is: all these years later, are you satisfied with how well High Society has stood the test of time with regards to discussing and documenting the theme of politics (both on an individual level and on a larger governmental scale)?

  9. Phreddie says:

    Mr. Sim,

    Cerebus, at 6000 pages can appear very imposing for a new reader and the world of Estarcion can be a bit confusing even for long-time ones. Have you ever thought of doing a “Who’s who and What’s what” character guide/reference book with new portraits of the cast, essays on items and locations, histories?

  10. Hi. Dave Sim here for my first stop at THE BEAT to answer your HARDtalk questions.

    Before we get started, I have a 100% “scoop” for Heidi: I got a fax from Karen Green at NYC’s Columbia University’s Butler Library expressing an interest in housing the Cerebus Archive as part of her graphic novels collection. I guess she heard both from Peter Jaffe at ComiXology and Jim Salicrup at Papercutz. I haven’t made any decisions — I don’t even know if the offers from Wilfrid Laurier University in Kitchener-Waterloo or NYU are still open. But I did think it was good news to have a NEW offer.

    I just feel bad because for YEARS I dreaded Heidi’s bi-annual phone calls looking for information about what was coming up in CEREBUS for Kim Thompson’s AMAZING HEROES PREVIEWS issues. “Heidi, I’ve been building to these moments for years, sometimes decades. I’m not going to tell you what’s going to happen three months from now when I’ve been waiting to spring it on the readers for six years or eight years.”

    So, there you go, Heidi — a 100% scoop. I haven’t even faxed Karen yet. You can’t get more of a scoop than that. Okay, and it’s Eddie Khanna with the question. Hi Eddie.

    Given the 35 years since Cerebus #1 first came out and your length of time in the comics’ industry and field, do you have any thoughts and opinions on the current state of the industry? Is it as dire as it seems, especially when someone like yourself who has managed to successfully self-publish 300 issues and kept 16 graphic novels in print and always seemed to have his finger on the pulse of the industry has to end 2 bi-monthly comics?

    I don’t think there’s enough public evidence to make even an educated guess. Everyone SOUNDS as if everything is fine — the stores, according to the stores, are doing land office business, the publishers, according to the publishers, are making money hand over fist — but I don’t know if that’s just how it SOUNDS because everyone’s just, you know, whistling past the graveyard. Obviously Steve Geppi and Bill Schanes have the best information: how many stores still exist and are viable-to-flourishing, how much store debt there is that Diamond is “carrying”, what the new normal is for those occasions when Steve has to pull the plug on a store and, perhaps most importantly, how much it actually costs to move these books all over the map every Wednesday. You could start asking questions and never stop. How sustainable is Free Comics Day? I would guess less sustainable than it was before September 2008 because everything is less sustainable than it was before September 2008. These are all Steve Geppi questions. I used to ask Bill Schanes “just between us” questions and he’d answer them off the record. I don’t even do that any more. It’s REALLY not my business. It’s not as if having Highest Possible Overview is going to tell me how to keep Aardvark-Vanaheim alive. If the sands shift and you’re in the wrong place, you’re toast. It’s not as if it’s being done TO me — we just live in a different world no one anticipated.

    Steve’s a very good businessman and no matter how many curves and change-ups you throw at him he always manages to get his fair share of opposite field hits when you don’t think he’s going to. Same with the retailers. The ones who are left are battle-tested, battle-hardened veterans and they’re having to make hard choices the same as Steve is. We’re all making hard choices.

    Thanks for your question.

    For having his question chosen, Eddie wins a CEREBUS back issue — probably a No.161 with the BONE Preview if they haven’t run out yet — personalized to him, signed by Dave and with a Cerebus head sketch. Got a question for Dave Sim? Post it here and you could win too if your question is selected.

    …And check out the rest of the HARDtalk Virtual Tour at A MOMENT OF CEREBUS.

  11. Gabriel McCann says:

    The obvious and easy question that no one seems to have asked you is “Is there one question that nobody has ever asked you that you’d like to answer?” In other words What is one thing (or several) things you’d like to tell people that has never been asked of you or in other words suppose you had a split personality what would Dave #2 ask Dave #1 that nobody else has ever asked.
    Quoting from an answer you made to one of my previous questions “If you didn’t make money at it, you’d really have to describe that as psychotic behaviour.”
    In that case what do you think of outsiders artists such as Henry Darger? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Darger
    You seem to read the Bible and other original material (The Koran?) but are you also reading later interpretations of religion such as William James The Varieties of Religious Experiences? Have you ever read SF author Philip K Dick (eg VALIS or The Transmigration of Timothy Archer). If so what did you think of their writings?

  12. Hi, Dave Sim here, back to answer more of your HARDtalk questions.

    Mr. Sim, CEREBUS, at 6,000 pages can appear very imposing for a new reader and the world of Estarcion can be a bit confusing even for long-time ones. Have you ever thought of doing a “Who’s Who and What’s What?” character guide/reference book with new portraits of the cast, essays on items and locations, histories?

    Hi, Phreddie — thanks for participating in the Tour! I’ve certainly thought about it — and you’ve definitely put your finger on the core problem: the 6,000 pages. Even I, having lived with it for 35 years, have trouble grasping how large the CEREBUS project is. There’s no precedent and no work analogous to it in terms of size. Anything you envision to promote or make it accessible stumbles out of the gate because even a reference work or a promotional work quickly mushrooms to a completely unwieldy size when you try to execute it however sensible it looks on paper.

    The cast has literally hundreds of characters, thousands of locations and innumerable histories. The wall map that Jeff Tundis did a few years back has, literally, thousands of locations on it and it’s about three feet tall. Alexx Kay did a very accurate Cerebus Timeline that’s pages and pages long. It’ll take you a good half hour just to read the MENU at Margaret Liss’ Cerebus Fan Girl website which is the most exhaustive information environment. Even for a devoted CEREBUS reader that’s a lot to wrap your head around and for a new reader, well forget about it!

    The approach I’ve decided to take for the moment — and there’s no guarantee it will succeed — is to focus on the individual trade paperbacks and try to make them accessible to new readers individually. HIGH SOCIETY AUDIO DIGITAL and HIGH SOCIETY DIGITAL are what I’m starting with.

    And to “back up” from there to an “accessible to everyone” point. In the case of HIGH SOCIETY, it’s the “trailer” that I did on CEREBUS TV and which we incorporated into the Kickstarter campaign that raised $63,000.

    Anyone can go to the Cerebus Kickstarter page, hit “play” and watch the 5 minute “trailer”.

    So, it’s a way for me to say: There. There’s a rough, hopefully entertaining look at what HIGH SOCIETY is. If that looks like something you might be interested in, then you might be interested in CEREBUS generally and might consider downloading the first digital issue for free starting October 10th either at Comixology, iVerse, Diamond Digital or Cerebus Downloads. It’s got the original pages, original cover, Deni’s Note from the Publisher, the original letters page, annotations from Cerebus Archive material, annotations for my Notebooks from the time period.

    All FREE on the first one.

    A gradual, smooth pretty much effortless introduction.

    At The Comics Journal’s website, right now, I’m even trying to back up the process further with the FORM & VOID volume. We’ve launched a discussion involving not only Kim Thompson as a potential print publisher/editor of a Fantagraphics version of the book but also any interested readers at the website and CEREBUS fans in how to package the book to make it more accessible. Which is probably weeks, if not months, in advance of producing a “trailer” and doing a Kickstarter campaign for that book… if negotiations go well. Again, emphasis on gradual, smooth and hopefully close to effortless.

    I do want to thank you for your question. I’ve jotted a note in my notebook to ask George Gatsis to incorporate a couple of links in HIGH SOCIETY AUDIO DIGITAL to the Cerebus Fangirl site, the Jeff Tundis Estarcion map and the Alexx Kay timeline. You know, “for answers to all of your questions about Cerebus’ world, go to…” Margaret even has a Wiki of all the characters’ names which people are gradually filling in. It’s a very basic and necessary addition to HIGH SOCIETY AUDIO DIGITAL, but until you asked your question, not something I had seen sitting there in plain sight. So thanks again! Much appreciated.

    For having his question chosen, Phreddie wins a CEREBUS back issue personalized to him, signed by Dave Sim and with a Cerebus head sketch. Have you got a question for Dave Sim? Post it here and you could win too if your question is selected.

    … and check out the rest of the HARDtalk Virtual Tour at A MOMENT OF CEREBUS.

  13. John Mosher says:

    Dave,

    In our never ending quest to heap work upon you, allow me to ask about the item I would like to see most. Is there any chance we could see a coffee table book – 11 x 14 or so – on high quality slick paper showcasing all 300 covers? I would shell out $150 for that…..

    John Mosher

  14. Hi Dave. I’m sorry to hear that finances doesn’t look very good. And I’ve got a HARDtalk question for you along those lines. I know that you are very pro self publishing. And that you have expressed doubts at for exampel TMNT franchising, and for exampel said no to the posibillity of a cerebus action figure connected with the crossover back in the days. Is there anything that you regret concerning leting other companies use the cerebus trademark. Do you now think a little more laxed view might have been good for your trademark and financially gainfull. Or are you as adamant now as ever? Also, in your thoughts about geting an other job. Is a drawing-kind-of-work out of the question? Do you view all your artistic work the same way, or might we one day meet Dave Sim corporate logo designer or advertisement creator?
    All the best to you.
    /tt

  15. Hi,
    Dave Sim back here at The Beat for more of your HARDtalk questions. In fact, Gabriel McCann has three questions:

    The obvious and easy question that no one seems to have asked you is “Is there one question that nobody has ever asked you that you’d like to answer?” In other words What is one thing (or several) things you’d like to tell people that has never been asked of you or in other words suppose you had a split personality what would Dave #2 ask Dave #1 that nobody else has ever asked.

    I don’t think this was EVER about EASY questions, Gabe (and belated thanks for the MARX BROTHERS ENCYCLOPEDIA you sent me years ago as Nala Eroom, the anti-Alan Moore — I can’t count the number of times it’s come in handy). That’s why it was called HARDtalk. I’d say the apex of the HARDtalk pyramid would have been “So what about honour killings? Giving equal weight to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, what’s your opinion of honour killings?”

    I couldn’t disagree with them more emphatically. As Hillary Clinton said about the Benghazi terrorist attack (or excessive YouTube protest as the case may be), “There’s no excuse for physical violence in any situation where you have a political disagreement.” 100% agree. I think the video is (inadvertently?) aptly called “The Innocence of Muslims” in the sense of naivete. “Guile-free”. Good Muslim families come to North America certain that they will continue to be good Muslim families. If a daughter brings dishonour on her family — particularly in Afghan, Saudi or Iranian culture — that can poison the whole family. I didn’t realize that until I read it in an article about honour killings. It’s not just the daughter who decides to go TOTALLY North American. None of her sisters will be considered marriageable. That doesn’t justify honour killings but it does explain them. I think you have to tackle the problem at its source: at the Western embassy in whatever country they’re applying to come here. Here. Here’s a picture of what your daughter is apt to look like after a couple of years. You okay with that? She’s right here with you. Look at this picture and turn to her and say, “Yes, Aisha, if that is how you want to dress, I will fine with that.” If he can’t do it, or refuses to sign a piece of paper to that effect, then, no, you can’t come to North America because WE don’t see it as any big deal and it’s OUR continent. And if you do sign and there’s ANY trouble with you, you get life in prison. I completely agree with “While you live under MY roof…” but we are decades past that. Fathers have NO say in anything and we have to face that that’s where we ARE. We have to replace it with “While you live on OUR continent…” I think we lose something HUGE as a society, making father’s opinions of NO effect, but I think we’ve already lost it. No use crying over spilled milk.

    Okay, now that everyone hates me for holding that opinion. What’s your next one, Gabe?

    Quoting from an answer you made to one of my previous questions: “If you didn’t make money at it, you’d really have to describe that as psychotic behaviour.” In that case what do you think of outsiders artists such as Henry Darger?

    I think you’re talking about the guy who created the whole pedophile world on paper, a metric tonne of material and no one knew he was doing it until he died and they found it. Yes, it was actually part of an exhibit in Columbus of comics material. The guy who came up with Victoria’s Secret and consequently has quadrillions of dollars to throw around. Forget his name. They had some of Darger’s work. As long as you have someone with quadrillions of dollars and he hires someone to put together an exhibit and the guy thinks Darger belongs and the Institution where you want to display it is okay with that, that’s pretty much the end of the discussion. Everyone who wants to be outraged or pretend to be outraged can be outraged or pretend to be outraged and the local papers can interview them and sell some papers and generate interest that wouldn’t be there otherwise… that’s how the game is played, isn’t it?

    Let’s take that one up to the apex of the HARDtalk pyramid. Why not just start an “Islam is Stupid” channel on YOUtube and do as many “Innocence of Muslims” videos as you want. New one every five seconds, each one more malicious and intentionally insulting as you can get. Yeah, a lot of people will die but — relatively speaking? — maybe a few thousand. Maybe ten thousand. “Innocence of Muslims” what’s the casualties figures? 148? We lost more soldiers than that in the average MINUTE during World War II, in the average SECOND in the early years of World War I. How bad do you want to enforce Freedom of Expression? That’s the way to do it. Keep track of the number of hits. “Five Hundred Million Served!” I’ll guarantee you they’ll get tired and quit before you will. But it will be REALLY messy and REALLY bloody for a lot of innocent civilians and diplomats for a period of time. Wouldn’t do it myself, think it’s a really bad idea but I’m not even a feminist. By definition: What do I know? Nothing. :)

    Okay, your third question. I’m going to miss you, Gabe. Write and tell me how you’re getting on. You know how I worry. Oh! And what ever happened with that PROMETHEA story I wrote for your Alan Moore zine? No, you go first.

    You seem to read the Bible and other original material (The Koran?) but are you also reading later interpretations of religion such as William James The Varieties of Religious Experiences? Have you ever read SF author Philip K Dick (eg VALIS or The Transmigration of Timothy Archer). If so what did you think of their writings?

    No, I don’t even read Biblical commentaries. I’m only interested in scripture and what it’s saying to me. I spent about an hour last Sunday writing a commentary on the Achan episode in JOSHUA, how I see it as prefiguring the Synoptic Jesus and particularly the twenty pieces of silver Judas got for betraying him and how that led to the tongues of Pentecostal Fire. I don’t have the verses and chapters here with me, but I know you wouldn’t be interested, anyway :) Maybe you would be. That would just be torturing the 98% of the comic-book field that want me GONE back to house arrest. I did read some Philip K. Dick. I didn’t find his fiction particularly interesting, but someone sent me a long interview with him. Ken Viola? Rick Veitch? My memory’s getting fuzzy. I think he definitely experienced the chessboard situation in a big way, becoming vividly aware that he was being moved around like a chess piece. I don’t think he did much with it that was of much significance or help, but just writing it all down and not specifying that you want it destroyed when you die so people don’t classify you as “bat-s–t insane” counts for a lot, I think.

    Check out all the HARDtalk Virtual Tour at A Moment Of Cerebus.

  16. Hi,
    Dave Sim back at The Beat for more of your HARDtalk questions – this time from John Mosher:

    Dave, In our never ending quest to heap work upon you, allow me to ask about the item I would like to see most. Is there any chance we could see a coffee table book – 11 x 14 or so – on high quality slick paper showcasing all 300 covers? I would shell out $150 for that…

    Well, I wasn’t going to. I really wasn’t and then your question came in. And I practically lit up like a Christmas tree. TOTALLY Bruce Wayne, bat flies in the window moment. “That’s IT — I must become a CEREBUS COVERS book! Or, NO! THREE CEREBUS COVERS books!” Must phone Ted Adams! Must phone Scott Dunbier! Conference call: GUYS! You have to fly up here. We have to get this cover deal done! John Mosher wants it! And Scott was all, like, gee, Dave, I don’t know. I’m getting this new swimming pool put in at the house. And Ted was like, it’s right before the New York Comicon! I’m booked solid with meetings. I probably won’t even make it to the Javitts Center itself. And I said, “He asked the question on THE BEAT.” You could have heard a pin drop. Dead silence for like ten seconds and Ted goes, “We can’t let Heidi down.” “Exactly,” I said.

    Thanks, John. Everybody who wants those covers books — you say “Thank you, John”. AND “Thank you, Heidi”.

    [John — send in your mailing address to ‘momentofcerebus [at] gmail [dot] com’ so that Dave can send you a personalised / signed / head-sketched Cerebus back issue — Thanks!]

    Check out all the HARDtalk Virtual Tour at A Moment Of Cerebus.

  17. Hi,
    Dave Sim back at The Beat for more HARDtalk. Today TT has a few questions for me:

    Hi Dave. I’m sorry to hear that finances doesn’t look very good. And I’ve got a HARDtalk question for you along those lines. I know that you are very pro self publishing. And that you have expressed doubts at for example TMNT franchising, and for example said no to the possibility of a cerebus action figure connected with the crossover back in the days. Is there anything that you regret concerning letting other companies use the cerebus trademark.

    Mm. No, not really. The TMNT thing resulted from me not knowing how these things work. I just figured Kevin or Peter would phone Playmate Toys and say, “We’re doing a Cerebus toy. No biggie, just a few hundred for laughs so Dave has one and we each have one. Make it happen.” And then some underling called from Playmate Toys…or their agent’s office or something. I needed to sign a contract. This one. And it was a typical “engulf and devour” contract. Well, no. This is just for laughs. I don’t even mind if I don’t get paid. I figured Kevin and Peter snapped their fingers and Playmate Toys asked “How high?” on the way up. I just hadn’t thought it through. There was just way too many loopholes in the contract that could have ended up enmeshing me in things I didn’t want to be enmeshed in. It was really stupid on my part and Pete really took it personally. That was IT between him and me. “We’re all done now.” Talk about losing too much for too little.

    Do you now think a little more laxed view might have been good for your trademark and financially gainful. Or are you as adamant now as ever?

    Mm. Possibly. There’s no control group for that. I tended — and tend — to have a gut instinct response. Like with Image. They were not popular with the professional community but my gut told me to do a Cerebus-as-Spawn for Todd. Another example of “just for laughs”. Did I ASK Todd if I could use the SPAWN costume? No. Did Todd make me sign a contract saying that I laid no claim to Cerebus-as-Spawn? No. Which, considering what happened with Neil and Medieval Spawn, I would have had a legal precedent. As soon as I put Cerebus in a Spawn costume, I own it, Todd. I didn’t make him sign anything saying that he didn’t have the rights to use Cerebus in a Spawn costume. It always seemed to me the best way to deal with that was “head on”. See? I put Cerebus in a Spawn costume, Todd ran it in his book, everyone got a good laugh. The world didn’t implode. “No lawyer made nickel one from this sight gag!” THAT’S the way I wanted to be relaxed about it. And Todd was cool with that.

    At this juncture it’s more that the point is moot. I’m toxic. Anyone doing a hit book would have to think twice about using Cerebus because of the “evil misogynist” thing. SPAWN 10 happened just a year or so before 186. Dave Sim was highly thought of at that time at least in terms of creator’s rights which is a lot of what Image was about. A different perception of it than I had and have but then Kevin and Peter had a different perception. At least we were calling the shots and doing what we wanted to do and — MOST of the time — not worrying about the lawyers.

    Also, in your thoughts about geting an other job. Is a drawing-kind-of-work out of the question? Do you view all your artistic work the same way, or might we one day meet Dave Sim corporate logo designer or advertisement creator? All the best to you.

    Everything is digital today. I don’t have Photoshop… or e-mail for that matter. I do all of my work — except for the Kubert font lettering — in “meat space”. That means I don’t exist. There is absolutely no danger of my getting work anywhere doing anything. I don’t think.

    Except something like the CEREBUS ATTACKS cover. Ted Adams is a huge Dave Sim fan. He will work around my not having e-mail. They moved their fax machine into or closer to Marci’s office. How cool is that? Where they had it a fax could sit there for a week and no one would see it. Who, besides Dave Sim, sends faxes in 2012? That’s not going to happen a lot of places. I just found out Eric Stephenson, another huge Dave Sim fan, is running Image Central. I’m thinking of asking Eric if I can do a WALKING DEAD cover or covers based on my (hopefully) demonstrable chops on the CEREBUS ATTACKS cover. David at Comixology gave me his cell number and I lost it. I hate to call David and admit that. “You LOST Eric Stephenson’s cell number?” Dave’s Seniors’ Moment.

    Twenty years after SPAWN 10, Dave Sim suddenly exists for ANOTHER five minutes! WHOA! Totally rad WALKING DEAD cover! Who’s this Dave Sim kid? Where have they been hiding him? Eric might have to dust off his fax machine or get someone to look for it. “We USED to have one of those, DIDN’T we? Yeah, look, here the number is on our letterhead! Come on, it’s got to be around here somewhere!” :)

    It would be nice to do some high-paying work, but NO ONE but a Dave Sim fan is going to work with a guy who only has an electric typewriter and a fax machine. I don’t think.

    All the best to you, as well.

    [TT — Send in your mailing address to ‘momentofcerebus [at] gmail [dot] com’ so that I can send you a personalised / signed / head-sketched Cerebus back-issue — Thanks!]

    Check out all the HARDtalk Virtual Tour at A Moment Of Cerebus.

  18. Dave has a point.

    Despite all our hard work to build the http://Cerebus.TV brand and as a result going from a couple thousand hits a month to a near million earlier this year – and 13,000 plus downloads of the MP4 Season 4 Premiere version alone in October – advertisers who were initially VERY interested on monetizing those kinds of numbers blanched when they found out what Dave Sim’s reputation was. They were afraid to have their firms or products associated with Dave.

    I’m sure I speak to the disappointment of the others who’ve invested so much time, money, energy and creativity into http://Cerebus.TV – Dave Fisher, John Scrudder, Dave himself, Oliver Simonsen and certainly Meegwun and myself – when we found this out.

    http://Cerebus.TV has been supported, therefore, solely by the donors who’ve generously clicked the PayPal button, bought art or prints – not from funding via Aardvark-Vanaheim’s other projects – but there just haven’t been enough of you who’ve done so to allow us to continue on a regular schedule.

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