Marvel announces new Ultimate Spider-Man of a different color [SPOILERS]

ALeqM5iw6VFfBYFLo4ZA EKKovaWgv8wlw Marvel announces new Ultimate Spider Man of a different color [SPOILERS]
All of you folks who have been crying about diversity in comics had better be all over this! Marvel has revealed that the new Ultimate Spider-Man will be Hispanic/African-American teenager Miles Morales. A USA Today story broke the news and reveals that yes, Donald Glover’s campaign to play Spider-Man was an influence on writer Brian Michael Bendis, although only as an indication that previous discussions about relaunching Spider-Man as a non-white character were on the right track.

More than a year ago, a Marvel Comics brain trust decided that, at least in the Ultimate Universe, Peter Parker needed to die, in a battle with the Green Goblin. When they began to think about whom they’d put under the new mask, a multicultural vibe emerged.

“It’s certainly long overdue,” Bendis says. “Even though there’s some amazing African-American and minority characters bouncing around in all the superhero universes, it’s still crazy lopsided.”

Despite some reports that books featuring non-white leads don’t sell in comics shops, we see this as a savvy move on Marvel’s part. Their characters have long been perceived as “urban,” with strong ties to the hip hop community so it is playing to another part of their base. In the AP story on the move, Marvel E-i-C- Axel Alonso references the ’70s vibe of such characters as Luke Cage and Shang-Chi.

Plus, it’s just acknowledging the world we live in. The United States is already one-third minority, and that percentage is just going to grow.

The story is also personal for both Bendis and Marvel E-i-C Axel Alonso — Alonso is half-Latino himself, and Bendis has two adopted daughters, a 3½-year-old from Ethiopia and a 4½-month-old African-American.

ADDED: Here’s a comment from J. Pines on this:

He is a half-black, half-hispanic teenager named Miles Morales. His origin story will be revealed when the new series premieres in September. The main reason I’m even writing about this is because when I saw half-black, half-hispanic, I really felt great pride because I, myself, am both. For the first time, if my parents ever tell me I can be anything I wanna be, it will, literally, be true. I can be a half-black, half hispanic Spider-Man. Marvel has paved the way and opened up the doors for us, mixed folk, who’ve always wanted a black and hispanic superhero we can aspire to be like.

The move is revealed in ULTIMATE FALLOUT #4, on sale tomorrow. ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN #1 debuts in September.

ALeqM5jefoeT9Uh40jmm7UGAHT6zD2sgZw Marvel announces new Ultimate Spider Man of a different color [SPOILERS]

Marvel PR below.

Pop culture history will be made tomorrow as Ultimate Comics Fallout #4 hits shelves and introduces readers to the all-new Ultimate Comics Spider-Man! That’s right, for the first time ever, someone other than Peter Parker will be Spider-Man! But, after the death of Peter Parker, who will rise up to defend the Ultimate Universe? Meet Miles Morales, a seemingly normal teenager from New York who will soon discover  that with great power comes great responsibility…and even greater danger! But just what are the secrets behind Miles’ shocking abilities? What’s his connection to the original Spider-Man? And just why does he wear that costume? Courtesy of superstars Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli, Ultimate Comics Fallout #4  begins the story that’ll have everyone talking for years to come!

“When the opportunity arose to create a new Spider-Man, we knew it had to be a character that represents the diversity—in background and experience—of the twenty-first century,” said Axel Alonso, Marvel Editor in Chief. “Miles is a character who not only follows in the tradition of relatable characters like Peter Parker, but also shows why he’s a new, unique kind of Spider-Man—and worthy of that name.”

With its inception in 2000, the Ultimate Comics Universe reimagined the world’s most popular super heroes for a new generation and has been critically lauded for its bold, resonant stories. In particular, Ultimate Spider-Man #1 is widely considered one of the most important comics of the century, setting records for trade paperback sales and introducing one of the most popular versions of Spider-Man ever. With the death of Peter Parker in June 2011, all eyes were once again on the Ultimate Comics Universe, as mainstream media and fans alike speculated just who Marvel would put under the mask of this beloved hero. Now, the chart-topping team of Bendis and Pichelli begin the next major chapter of the Ultimate Comics Universe with September’s historic Ultimate Comics spider-Man #1, giving readers a chance to learn the origin of the most important new character of the century.

“The chance for the world to join a new Spider-Man as he discovers what that means in this modern world is one of the most challenging and crazy fun opportunities I’ve had as a writer,” explained Bendis. “The Ultimate Comics Universe according to Miles is completely unique.  I can’t wait to write every issue and I can’t wait for people to start reading them.”

Pichelli added, “I promise, you will fall in love with Miles– I already did. ‘Nuff Said.”

The world’s greatest super hero icon is about to undergo the most groundbreaking reinvention in comic book history—where will you be when the mask is lifted? Pick up Ultimate Comics Fallout #4 tomorrow at your local comic shop or digitally on the Marvel Comics App for iOS devices.

ULTIMATE FALLOUT #4 (JUN110612)
Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, JONATHAN HICKMAN & NICK SPENCER
Art by SARA PICHELLI, SALVADOR LARROCA & CLAYTON CRAIN
Cover by MARK BAGLEY
ON SALE TOMORROW!

ULTIMATE COMICS SPIDER-MAN #1 (JUL110605)
Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
Penciled by SARA PICHELLI
Cover by KAARE ANDREWS (Cover will be POLYBAGGED)
Variant Cover by SARA PICHELLI
FOC—8/22/11, On-Sale—9/14/11

ULTIMATE COMICS SPIDER-MAN #2 (JUL110607)
Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
Penciled by SARA PICHELLI
Cover by KAARE ANDREWS
FOC—8/29/11, On-Sale—9/21/11

Comments

  1. Joseph says:

    I am going to miss ultimate Peter Parker, but really like this idea. Looking forward to reading the comic.

  2. Love it.

  3. blacaucasian says:

    As someone who is bi-racial living in a country with a bi-racial president, kudos to Marvel for this. I don’t think people can truly understand the impact this can have for kids growing up. Now Marvel has to just work on getting it into their hands.

  4. comicgiy says:

    Political correctness run amok. Kill off whitey. Replace with multiculti. As a white person who has read and loved Spiderman my whole life, I am out. Will no longer buy Spiderman or Marvel.

    They could easily have created a new black/hispanic hero if they wanted to but this guy Alonso changing a cultural icon is a FU to white Americans. This is a FU moment to white people.

    The proper response of all all white people in America is to boycott Marvel comics. Marvel said FU to white people. So we say to Marvel FU back.

    Go DC!

  5. Man is there a ton of potential for this (and damn is that a beauty of an image), but I can also imagine something incredibly cliche and phoney. Hope they focus on the character and who *he* is, not what cultural role he is/should be/shouldn’t be. I’m definitely interested.

  6. So I guess the original purpose of the Ultimate line has been completely tossed away.

  7. NateInNY says:

    That’s the genius of the “Ultimates”. You can change everything, kill off everyone, replace everyone with different races or genders and it doesn’t matter because there is still the trusty 616 to run to.

    See DC? This is how you add diversity without really adding diversity!

  8. “Plus, it’s just acknowledging the world we live in. The United States is already one-third minority, and that percentage is just going to grow.”
    I’m not American, so have no real clue about this, but Census numbers on Wiki reveal that as of 2010, the US was 72% white, with ‘Black or African American alone’ next at 12.6%
    But then it goes on to explain that “white” includes “white Hispanic and Latino Americans”. So it is a very strange breakdown.
    Maine USA is highest in white population with 95.2%, and Hawaii is lowest with 24.7%

  9. The Ultimate line has always been about recontextualizing characters in a way that couldn’t be done in the regular comics.

    It hasn’t always been successful at that, but when it’s on the ball it’s interesting reading.

    Killing Peter Parker and having his death inspire legacy characters is exactly the What If?/Elseworlds tradition I like to see in the Ultimates line. Still familiar, but also completely different.

    The gripers are using massive exaggerations to justify their racial hatred. This isn’t a fifty-year-old character being replaced, it’s a ten-year-old character in a universe that was created to experiment with new things.

  10. >> They could easily have created a new black/hispanic hero if they wanted to but this guy Alonso changing a cultural icon is a FU to white Americans. This is a FU moment to white people.>>

    Speaking as a white people, I’m nowhere near as racist or narrow-minded as that. I think it sounds like a terrific idea.

    People who aren’t like me don’t have cooties, after all (something I learned while fairly young, about those icky gurls I turned out to be completely wrong about), and I don’t think Marvel is for a moment delivering a FU (Fordham University, I expect) to white people by publishing lots of Peter Parker material but having the Spider-Man of a different continuity be a different guy.

  11. @comicgiy,
    You know this morning I posted this about the Spider-Man change:
    You know the thing is, if they just said it was a new guy in the suit and didn’t change his race people would just go, ‘oh that’s weird..’
    but now just watch, with the race change you’ll hear: oh here we go again with this PC crap, or look how they’re shoving diversity down our throats. because you know if he’s not a straight white guy, that’s just not normal now is it?

    thank you for proving my point.

  12. joe.distort says:

    i think its kinda rad that they would make such a choice when they KNOW the kind of mongoloid responses people would have. nice move! im very white, pale even, and am in no conceivable way offended unlike our friend up in the comments. now for my real complaints:

    drop the prices on these ultimate books (which i truly dont expect) and please dont bring back parker in 2 years for some sort of ‘look whos back!’ stunt

  13. blacaucasian says:

    “They could easily have created a new black/hispanic hero if they wanted to but this guy Alonso changing a cultural icon is a FU to white Americans. This is a FU moment to white people.

    The proper response of all all white people in America is to boycott Marvel comics. Marvel said FU to white people. So we say to Marvel FU back.”

    Ummm…wow.

  14. Matthew Southworth says:

    Presumably comicgiy is just a troll, don’t take that reactionary bullshit seriously.

    And if he is serious, really is SO offended that he is taking his toys and going home, I’m happy to help him fold up his White Power banner and box up his David Duke action figures.

    Another possible (more charitable) angle is he just doesn’t understand that the Ultimate universe does not replace the traditional Marvel Universe. So Spider-Man is still a white guy, blah blah blah, don’t worry, your kids won’t be denied the spectacle of a WASP guy overcoming obstacles. The Ultimate line is a parallel universe, a universe where it’s NOT strange to have an African-American character as its central hero.

    I’m quite happy to have my imagination live in that universe. I’ll pick up this book and check it out.

  15. Matthew Southworth says:

    P.S. I wonder if comicgiy is reading Blacaucasian’s response and measuring how seriously to take it:

    “Well, the FIRST part of his name is Blac, so he must be a black guy! So of course he’s all for this Affirmative Action scenario! But then, wait now, I see the SECOND part of his name is Caucasian, which makes him one of my white brothers. We’re partners in the struggle!

    “But you can’t be both white AND black, can you?! Dang, I got me a headache.”

  16. blacaucasian says:

    Matthew Southworth – you are my hero. Thanks. I needed that.

  17. nyocean says:

    This is one giant leap for man- and superhuman-kind! One giant web-swing, too! Long overdue and completely necessary. And fitting, as a lot of b-boys and b-girls have evolved style from Spidey, a large influence has always been shared by the African-American and Latina/o communities with hip hop and youth trends that are global today-for youth of all cultural backgrounds. It is also important to note that Marvel did this with Spider-Man 2099, where Miguel O’Hara is Spider-Man, a scientist of Mixed ethnic background, being half Mexican, half Irish – and touting a costume fashioned on the celebration of Mexico’s el Dia de Los Muertos, or Day of the dead. The character has always inspired me, not simply because of this angle, but because of the extra angle I could feel affinity for, which goes a long way for youth growing up who could use a diversity of role models they would like to relate to – be they of European descent or somewhere else on our planet! I am of both White and Latina/o heritage and I will always roll with Peter Parker, who I’ve followed since I was 9yrs old! And you know what? If Peter were commenting on this issue, he would support the change as well. I believe that in my heart and hope people can get over their comfort zones to embrace the new Ultimate Spidey too – not that comic readers really trip that hard to begin with. I mean c’mon, if almost all comic heroes are modeled on White people to begin with, and we all still love them either way, why not create more diversity in characters (not just aliens, which are cool too, but I’m just saying, really though)? Remember, this is what our world actually looks like! And, this is a very empowering move…and with great power comes great responsibility. So embrace change and support your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man!

  18. I think this is fantastic! Although having to explain the difference between Miles and Peter Parker is going to make comics even more confusing.

  19. hikaru says:

    It’s a brilliant move. Bravo, Marvel. If they just created “another” minority character, it would be forgotten about years down the road at the worst. As a 1/2 asian, 1/2 american it gives me a huge sense joy to see one of the most iconic heroes played by a minority.

    Given the statistically lopsided justice system in the U.S., this not only opens the door for decades worth of new stories but also makes for relevant superhero stories in the 21st Century.

    Combine this with Matt Murdoch cleaning up Hell’s Kitchen and moving on, I am beginning to feel reenergized seeing Marvel moving forward which is all too rare with the Big 2.

  20. When I first saw this I was a little concerned: how do you replace Peter Parker?

    But that picture of Miles pulling off the mask? The large concerned eyes? He LOOKS like Spiderman. That same, somewhat innocent, genial look that Peter had too…

    I’m excited.

    Plus if Donald Glover can play Spiderman in the movies, that would be cool. >3>;;

  21. Chris Hero says:

    I’m not a fan of superhero comics and generally try to stay the Hell out of comic stores, but I’m actually excited about this. I think I might…buy…this series.

  22. I love the idea of Miles Morales being the new Ultimate Spider-Man. John Byrne on the other hand isn’t quite so happy.

    “More creative bankruptcy. Remember the Black Panther? Remember Luke Cage?

    Somewhere along the line — and, sadly, it’s not recent — Black characters at Marvel suddenly were only allowed if they adopted the names of existing characters. Iron Man. Captain Marvel. Giant-Man (who’d begun with the staggeringly original name “Black Goliath”). Nick Fury. Now, a Black Spider-Man.

    I’ll admit to having created only a handful of Black characters, but at least NONE of them were forced to follow in some White guy’s footsteps.

    Aren’t Black audiences weary yet of this modern-day Minstrel Show?”

    http://www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=39522&PN=0&TPN=1

  23. Recasting Nick Fury as Sam Jackson in the original Ultimates was GENIUS, Isaiah Bradley (and his grandson) also GENIUS, but all this “What if Spider-man was black-tino? What if Spider-girl was latino?” smells like more like a marketing department directive (How can we make our brand more “urban”?) than a creative concept.

  24. Torsten Adair says:

    Peter Parker has many qualities that are shared with minorities…

    A lower middle class upbringing, raised by his aunt and uncle
    Working his way through college, juggling responsibilities
    Mistrusted and persecuted by those in authority

    While you’re waiting for the new US-M, go read Peter Parker: Spider-Man (Vol. 2) #35, “Heroes Don’t Cry”.

  25. Ian Boothby says:

    I like the new Spider-Man but wish it could have been done without killing Peter Parker. Dying while trying to save a guy with a shield from a bullet to the knees? Really?

  26. Earth-2 Chad says:

    Ian, that wasn’t what killed him. It weakened him, but ultimately, he died fighting the Green Goblin.

    As for the change, I’m game.

  27. “The Ultimate line has always been about recontextualizing characters in a way that couldn’t be done in the regular comics.”

    That was not the original stated purpose. The original purpose was to do the characters in a modern setting without all the continuity and baggage that had accumulated over the years as an introduction of these classic characters to new readers. Before the name “Ultimate” was coined it was announced as the “Ground Zero line”, (as in “you can now get in on the story at ground zero” instead of chapter 400 and after 911 I’m sure Marvel was very happy that they changed that name).

    Mind you this very noble purpose was lost almost immediately but that was the original intent of the line. The line was not to do stuff you couldn’t do in the “regular universe”, Marvel already had that, it was called “What If”. (And wasn’t there a What If where a black kid did become Spider-Man?)

    As I said this was lost almost immediately but at least Spider-Man remained a character I, and I assume most of the general public recognized, after this, that is no longer true.

    For the record I’m not bothered by this, I never “gelled” to the Ultimate line and I’ve read comics long enough to know that any change, no matter how drastic, can be undone, (sometimes in a single page).

    Also for the record, I do think John Byrne has some valid points, I think he phrases them in a very, (probably intentionally) controversial and confrontational way but I think the idea of African American’s just taking over the role of existing characters rather then have new characters created with them in mind is valid argument and worth discussing rather dismissing. (I wouldn’t discuss it on his board because of the whole “controversial and confrontational” thing but I do think it is a valid point).

  28. I like the Ultimate version of a black Nick Fury better than the original Nick Fury. So I see no reason why not have a black/hispanic Spider-man.

    Especially as I see the Ultimate line as the place to do things a bit differently from the status quo.

    comicgiy’s and others racist comments are disappointing. Personally, as a white guy I think this is great.

  29. “Miles Morales”? That name is pure douchechills.

  30. “I like the new Spider-Man but wish it could have been done without killing Peter Parker. Dying while trying to save a guy with a shield from a bullet to the knees? Really?”

    I agree with you, but unfortunately if Peter didn’t die fans would complain that Peter would inevitably take the role back, so a noble death makes it seem like they don’t have an easy out (because no comic character every died, had his role taken over by others, then came back, it’s not like they did that to Superman or Batman or Captain America, oh wait.)

  31. Andrew Farago says:

    I think Stan Lee himself often said that part of the appeal of Spider-Man is that he could be anybody under that mask, and race, creed, or color. I’m interested to see where all this goes, myself.

  32. I’m all for new ideas but if feels like back in the day (says the old reader) you didn’t have to kill the old for the new, you just added to the mix.
    Peter Parker’s arc was an inexperienced kid trying his best who was often told by people like Daredevil and Aunt May that he was in over his head, didn’t know what he was doing and he was going to get himself killed. And he did. The end.
    It just feels flat. Sad and not in a good way. Like I said before blocking a non fatal shot to the knees which weakens him enough that he gets killed in the same kind of fight he was most issues? That’s the end of his story?
    it just feels like death has been such a cliche that grabs headlines and bumps sales that it just feels hollow. And Spider-Man deserves better.

  33. AL(TM):
    “I’m not American, so have no real clue about this, but Census numbers on Wiki reveal that as of 2010, the US was 72% white, with ‘Black or African American alone’ next at 12.6%”

    I think they’re using the same math that was used to determine the number of women working for DC.

  34. ” … the new Ultimate Spider-man will be Hispanic/African-American teenager Miles Morales.”

    Lame.

    At least they could have given him a non-alliterative name.

    Maybe they can do a “616” movie with George Clooney as Nick Fury. I still prefer the Steranko super-cool spy.

  35. Ian Boothby says:

    DrRaw is correct, this could mean an end of White Excellence.

  36. Wow. The *real* bigots hit The Beat after 6pm.

  37. Boffo97 says:

    Dumb move.

    I agree that comics need more minority characters, but make them new original characters, and give them talented staffs to make them catch on.

    Killing characters just to replace them with affirmative action legacies just creates division in the fanbase… and basically makes the statement that the only original characters that can succeed are whites, which is pretty racist.

    Though it is hilarious that Marvel is trying to present this as some new idea. Maybe they should research it and find out how many of these characters failed, typically to be replaced by the originals again.

  38. blacaucasian says:

    Hey DRRaw – I happen to be bi-racial, just like the new Spider-man. My father, who is black, never picked lettuce. My mother is not a crack addict. And I just got home form my job, which I work hard at sometimes up to 55 to 60 hours a week. So before you embarrass yourself even more by throwing out ridiculous, demeaning, and ignorant stereotypes like you have in your last few posts, why don’t you just quit while your ahead and move on.

    Incidentally, you still have your white, suburban, racially safe Spider-man in the 616 books that “matter”. So take that and your bigoted and mean-spirited opinions to a forum where you can still revel in a world where Spider-Man is still Caucasian.

  39. DrRaw,

    I hope someone from your trailer park steals your computer so that you can’t ever post on the internet again.

  40. Don’t you ever find it a little ironic that a racist is now preaching to me about using racial slurs (of which I used none)

    The difference between the two of us is that I’m joking and you’re completely serious with your ignorance and racism.

    I obviously know that not all poor white people live in trailer parks or are racist, and I was joking, but you seem to believe that all minorities are crooks or immoral and bent on destroying the United States.

    I can also put my name to a post and not be afraid and resort to hiding behind an alias. You ever wonder why that is? It’s because I’m not ashamed of my beliefs. If you weren’t, you would post everything you wrote here on your Facebook or your front window. But you won’t, because you’re an internet tough guy.

  41. Wow… I thought comicguy had set the low point early on, but DrRaw manages to out do his racists comments. :-(

    Anyways, I imagine the first issue will for sure sell out with the attention it’s getting. Hopefully it will continue to have success after that. While it does smell like a sales stunt, I hope it works out long term for Marvel.

  42. This is starting to sound like my family. We are mixed “races” (I’m all for the human race) through marriages and breeding, including black, white, and Hispanics. Non of these things ever seem to be a problem for us. Only the alcoholics trouble us, and they come in every family and in every color. I’m all set to complain about Iron Man if anyone cares to join me. lol.

  43. Keep talking about liberals and thought police and your scaremongering tactics. Keep talking about how your views are SO RADICAL and the world is OUT TO GET YOU, yet you’re content to hide behind an alias and make fun of other people who use their real name.

    Call me a liberal, call me whatever you want. Doesn’t change the fact that we’re both arguing on the internet like we’re going to change each other’s opinions. I’m just content with pointing out how ignorant you are. You’re painting all people with the same brush. Should I assume that all Army vets who are Republicans are potential terrorists because of Timothy McVeigh.

    There are criminals and vile people of all colors, races, creed, and ethnic background. To cast out an entire group of people as undesirable or second class is ignorant and close minded.

    You’re ashamed of your own views and you won’t admit it.

    I’m done battling it out with you on this board. You will obviously never learn to look beyond someone’s appearance, and I’m deeply sorry for you because of that.

  44. As the whitest person on the internet, I heartily welcome this development. Ultimate Peter Parker had plenty of time to have plenty of adventures (and, given the nature of superhero comics, has a decent shot of returning at some point) and the main Peter Parker is still doin’ his thing in the regular continuity.

    Meanwhile, this gives us the chance to see what Spider-Man is like when the person under the mask has a slightly different background. How will he approach crime-fighting? What kind of battle banter will he have? Will he have a similar relationship to the other heroes, or will they treat him differently? All interesting questions that can only be answered in a situation like this.

    Plus, he’s cute. Marvel, please give us more details on what you mean by “teen” so I can know if I’m being a total creeper for finding him cute. Thank you. :]

  45. So let me get this straight. The way to fix this is for comics to adopt the ‘separate but equal’ strategy from the old ‘Jim Crow’ laws??

  46. People, sorry about that. I should have known better than to take some time off for dinner on a day with this kind of news. I’ve deleted the racist invaders comments as well as some that repeated his ignorance.

  47. OtisTFirefly says:

    >>>Political correctness run amok. Kill off whitey. Replace with multiculti. As a white person who has read and loved Spiderman my whole life, I am out. Will no longer buy Spiderman or Marvel.

    The proper response of all all white people in America is to boycott Marvel comics. Marvel said FU to white people. So we say to Marvel FU back.

    Go DC!>>>

    LOL! I advise you to go buy the new Blue Beetle comic and to follow the adventures of the Atom in the new JLA book!

    @ Rich
    >>>AL(TM):
    “I’m not American, so have no real clue about this, but Census numbers on Wiki reveal that as of 2010, the US was 72% white, with ‘Black or African American alone’ next at 12.6%”

    I think they’re using the same math that was used to determine the number of women working for DC.>>>

    Where do you get that? The numbers are correct… he just leaves out the 16.3 percent Hispanic.

  48. I think it’s a small step in the right direction. Marvel should have MORE minority-race characters, and in their regular continuity.

    It also may have the effect of sabotaging Steve Bissette’s Marvel boycott. I know I’d like to read about a black/Latino Spider-Man.

    By the way, it’s possible to be black/Latino without being “half-black, half-Latino.” There are plenty of fully-black families who have lived for generations in Latin America, and they have Spanish names, speak Spanish, etc. I don’t know where this Miles Morales fits into this, but, you know, just sayin.’

    Also by the way, having been schooled on this point myself, I should mention that using the term “non-white” is considered bad form. The more polite term is “person(s) of color.”

  49. I’m beginning to think DrRaw’s postings are satirical in nature, instead of genuinely reflecting personal racist beliefs. He’s using the most attention-drawing means to draw attention to something real.

    As DrRaw states, Marvel SHOULD hire more black (and female, and LGBT) writers and artists (as should DC, IDW, etc.) and SHOULD create new characters that more closely reflect the population of the real world outside.

    Dwayne McDuffie and others did that at DC’s Milestone line in the 90’s, and created one of the most diverse AND entertaining lines of super-hero comics I’ve ever read. I still miss those comics, and I hope that Static Shock becomes a major hit during DC’s relaunch.

    Is Peter Parker white? Is it part of his Peter Parker-ness? I’d say yes. Changing Peter’s ethnicity, age, city of origin, etc. changes who he inherently is. Does Spider-Man have to be white? Is it part of his inherent Spider-Man-ness? Nope. For a while in the 90’s Spider-Man was a clone,and for a few months, Spider-man was impersonated by a teenaged girl for goshsakes! Anyone with the proportionate strength, speed and agility of a spider, who has learned that with great power must also come great responsibility, can be Spider-Man.

    I hope I’m right about DrRaw, and that this is a sane person using inflammatory language to both point out peoples ridiculousness in their objections to this character, and sneak in some subtler social commentary.

    I could be wrong though, it could just be the ravings of an ass, with an accidental good point in the middle.

  50. Heidi, I think you should reconsider removing those posts. This subject is being discussed all over teh internets, and it’s as good a time as any to have a discussion about race in comics.

    Especially since I just spent an hour writing a response to them! :P

  51. Brian, I admire your youthful optimism but there are real racists in America, and that was one of them. Such trollish bait can’t be left up. I’m relly sorry I let it get this far.

  52. >> As DrRaw states, Marvel SHOULD hire more black (and female, and LGBT) writers and artists (as should DC, IDW, etc.) and SHOULD create new characters that more closely reflect the population of the real world outside.>>

    It was funny how he said that creating minority characters should be left to minorities, as if most classic Marvel characters weren’t created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, both Jewish.

    But even funnier is how he was objecting to the new Ultimate Spidey being half-Hispanic because he thinks minority characters should be brought into comics by minorities, when the creative side of the company is being run by the Cuban-American Joe Quesada and the half-Hispanic Axel Alonso, not to mention being written by the Jewish Brian Bendis, who has two African-American children.

    Looks like what he was pretending to argue for as a way of hating on the new character is exactly what’s happened.

  53. The truth is we live in a multicultural society whether you know it or not. And, based on what I’ve seen of the world, that’s part of what makes this nation TRULY great.

    And with that I am closing comments!