Marvel releases first look at remastered Miracleman #1

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Finally, a look at the new “remastered” MIRACLEMAN #1 by Alan Moore (name removed at his own request so credited as THE ORIGINAL WRITER) and Garry Leach with Mick Anglo along for the ride.

The new Marvel edition has modern computer coloring on some pages which leaves the art, if anything, flatter than the original, IN OUR OPINION. Retro moire patterns and all. But tastes change and all that.

“When these stories were originally colored, the artists were never consulted – and it shows” said Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso. “The coloring methods used at the time really hurt the finished product. But through close collaboration with all the artists, we’re proud to now present these stories in a manner that matches their creative vision.”

Working in closely with the original series artists, MIRACLEMAN has been remastered using the original artwork in every instance possible – and the most advanced restoration methods available applied to ensure the most authentic reading experience based on the artists’ original visions for the series.

“You’ve never really seen Miracleman, until you’ve seen this Miracleman,” said legendary Miracleman artist Garry Leach. “I’m positive this will rapidly be recognized as the all-time, definitive, Miracleman series. It’s simply looking that ridiculously sharp!”

In addition to material originally published in Warrior Magazine, MIRACLEMAN #1 also includes character designs, pencil sketches, original art, an article chronicling the history of Marvelman/Miracleman, an interview with Miracleman creator Mick Anglo, as well as a Mick Anglo’s first Marvelman stories. Don’t miss your opportunity to experience the most popular comic few have ever read when MIRACLEMAN #1 makes it’s long overdue return to comic shops this January!


The first issue goes on sale January 15th with variant covers by Joe Quesada, Mark Buckingham, John Cassaday, Skottie Young, Garry Leach, Jerome Opena, and Leinil Yu.

OH AND PS: Graeme McMillan has a side-by-side comparison of the old and new coloring here.

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Comments

  1. This is going to be a tough one to trade wait. I haven’t read these stories since the Eclipse reprints from the 80’s. Really looking forward to this.

  2. The colour in the Eclipse reprints was mostly truly terrible, though. I’m quite happy with this, so far – something I didn’t think I’d be saying!

  3. This recoloring is not nearly as horrific as I feared.

  4. Kurt Busiek says:

    The relettering is pretty good, too. Doesn’t quite match the original, but it won’t be jarring.

  5. I looked at the side-by-sides and I have to say I miss the garish fields of yellow and orange from the original. I appreciate the remastering and cleaning, but I would have liked something more daring than just standard superhero comic colors. There’s a sense of horror and unease that’s been sanitized out of the new edition.

  6. Sam Thielman says:

    I do NOT miss the original coloring. Large swaths of the first book and a half were nigh-unreadable because of the crummily handled transition from B&W British mag format to color US comic book. I thoroughly applaud this. Now preserve Sam Parsons’ gorgeous watercolors on the later issues and we’ll be in business.

  7. I re-read these stories last year and found the coloring to be just awful, even for standards back in the ’80s. The books were murky at best. This recoloring job looks like a breath of fresh air to a property that has been sitting for a very long time.

  8. jacob lyon goddard says:

    I find the new lettering horribly jarring.

  9. jacob lyon goddard says:

    And the new coloring doesn’t look bad, just boring and the completely average current house style.

  10. Better… But I still prefer the original black and white. To these eyes used to American superhero books in color, the black and white helped communicate that this was something different.

  11. Hardcover B&W omnibus eventually tho, right?

  12. Are they really going to add/extend the artwork on all the WARRIOR pages to fit the aspect ratio of current American comics? It’s not too noticeable on the pages they chose for the preview, since the extra art is just starfields and impact lines and such, but on other pages making up that extra inch of art will probably require some actual drawing.

  13. Johnny Memeonic says:

    They probably didn’t have a choice in re-lettering the stories that were in Warrior. The original work was done to a magazine size that doesn’t compress well when converted to modern size American comics.

  14. johnrobiethecat says:

    Hmm, the old coloring looks much better. Communicates the story more effectively from pages I’m seeing….

    For example, the eye close-up shot is a kind of masterful scene in 80’s form as is. They removed the hot/warm alternating values in favor of these putridy gray-purples tones and limp blue background, losing the effect,. They shift values dramatically and confuse the focus.

    The opening space scene page has been completely whitewashed of its mood and tone which looked better in orginal. If Marvel has to go back this far in the past to find a book they don’t have the creative talent to make now, why don’t they respect its visual integrity? Techinically sharper imagery but poor storytelling choices, the modern-age Marvel way. They are trying to “All-New X-men” this thing up to be as convoluted as their current line of books are .

  15. Kurt Busiek says:

    >> If Marvel has to go back this far in the past to find a book they don’t have the creative talent to make now, why don’t they respect its visual integrity?>>

    Because that “visual integrity” you’re lauding was the result of pages drawn for black and white repro, colored by someone who didn’t have any contact with the artist and didn’t know his intentions, and was so disliked that the coloring was redone by the same publisher a few years later to try to make it better. This wasn’t the original intent, after all. The original intent was the black-and-white of WARRIOR #1, where it first appeared.

    The “eye close-up” is better now, to my mind, because it starts out bright and crisp and darkens, creating a transition to what follows, which is the intent of the page and which came across in black and white as black takes over the panels, but which the original coloring blew off, staying equally bright all the way through.

    The opening space scene is superior in the new version, too — the sleeping Moran figure is lost in the background in the first Eclipse version, and the other Miraclekid gets lost in the yellows at the bottom of the panel. The figures and main shapes in the panels stand out better in the new version; the old one has too much blue on blue or yellow on yellow, losing the clarity of the black-and-white art.

    You can see all four versions here: http://mistahphil.tumblr.com/post/69617657544/miracleman-color-comparisons-from-left

    …and it seems clear that many of the “fixes” Marvel is making are being done for the same reason Eclipse changed the coloring in 1990; to better serve the intent and storytelling of the actual black-and-white art it started out as.

    Eclipse’s first color comic book version wasn’t some glorious piece of harmonious creative integrity embraced by the creators. It was a workmanlike job done without the consultation of the creators, and it was poorly enough received by creators and readers that they spent money to fix it almost 25 years ago. Hardly a matter of Marvel coming in now and running roughshod — Eclipse themselves had Sam Parsons redo it to work better.

    For the new version, Marvel actually consulted with Garry Leach, getting their colors to be even more of what he wanted that the 1990 revision, and much more than the first color version.

    I think both the storytelling choices and the creative integrity of the artist’s intent are better served by the new version. The artist does, too.

    So as far as respecting creative integrity goes, I think the version that actually involved the artist, asked for his feedback and got his approval is the one with greater integrity. I know it’s Marvel, but that doesn’t mean they automatically have less concern for the creators than Eclipse — it took Eclipse a while to figure out how best to present the material themselves, and they didn’t come out of the gate at 100%.

  16. Johnny Memeonic says:

    Agreed. Always prefer the original coloring to these reprint colorings. Original intent is lost, rampant mistakes (like that previous story that showed a Conan panel where a river had been colored the same as the surrounding grassland), and frankly it’s disrespectful to the original colorist on the comic.

    If their work isn’t good enough all of a sudden then why not redraw all that decades old artwork while they’re at it?

  17. Steve Replogle says:

    I think the color looks good. I’m very glad Garry Leach was consulted. I’m also simply happy that Marvel is starting things off with the old Marvelman story, retrofitted with the one-page Nietzsche quote. I loved that in the original Eclipse comic, and to me it has always been, er, canon.

  18. johnrobiethecat says:

    @kdb,

    I don’t doubt your knowledge on the matter and you’ve proven me wrong more times than I can count. But visually, from what I’m seeing compared to originals, something important has been lost.. The color from today’s Marvel is clean but tepid and isn’t serving the storytelling as well at least on page one and eye shot. They could have done better.

    >>Because that “visual integrity” you’re lauding was the result of pages drawn for black and white repro, colored by someone who didn’t have any contact with the artist and didn’t know his intentions, and was so disliked that the coloring was redone by the same publisher a few years later to try to make it better. This wasn’t the original intent, after all. The original intent was the black-and-white of WARRIOR #1, where it first appeared.>>

    The colorist from the 80’s had the good fortune from being from that era with limited means so he had to be more resurceful and naturally in tune with material and times. It feels more sci-fi in his version. Page 1 from Marvel is middling, like they are afraid of bold tones so they whitewash those areas . I like the ship details and color underneath but they bleached the values too much. The lack of commitment from Marvel version creates more whitish areas on the page that competes with the text. And looks convuluted with text. The guy in dream montage behind him is now red and higher in vallue. Also, no sense of mood, unlike originals. I respect what the original colorist had to work with, limited means. But I prefer somone who at least some sort of tonal plan than the guy here who is just playing it safe by what they do on the X-Men every week. I do like l colors in some panels, like the guy popping out of the roof and stuff here but their is too many trade-offs on other panels for the few successes, Don’t lose the whole mood.

    <>

    The adjustment there could have been making the acidic colors a bit more natural and tweaked more than recolored into what they do on a standard noir book.. The scene now just looks drained of any impact and closing up looks awkward and odd closeup as result. The hot colors in original whether intentional or not , convey the feverishness of the characters inner life more in the eye-shot page.Tthe putrid purple/gray colors of Marvel just are just tepid and makes the closeup seem drained of drama and odd as a result. You don’t see that?

    >>The opening space scene is superior in the new version, too — the sleeping Moran figure is lost in the background in the first Eclipse version, and the other Miraclekid gets lost in the yellows at the bottom of the panel. The figures and main shapes in the panels stand out better in the new version; the old one has too much blue on blue or yellow on yellow, losing the clarity of the black-and-white art.>>

    Maybe its more the old version is more painterly than you prefer. Details are nicer but taking out acid yellows and acid greens (which is OK by me) is different than remapping all the tones. Be interesting to hear Alan Moore’s take . The Watchmen’s color was as thought out and striking as the art. League, other books too.

    >>For the new version, Marvel actually consulted with Garry Leach, getting their colors to be even more of what he wanted that the 1990 revision, and much more than the first color version.>>

    I think both the storytelling choices and the creative integrity of the artist’s intent are better served by the new version. The artist does, too.>>

    A lot of pencillers don’t understand color to the point of a P. Craig Russell or Mike Mignola. True, they are in charge of visulas but judging from current ouput, I would take Glynis Wein’s colors over a modern John Byrne’s if they went back and redid the 80’s X-Mens for example and consulted Byrne for the colors. Not to pick on JB but its an easy example when you look at what he’s colored himself at IDW. Some artists are bad colorists because they always had someone doing it for them, a solid professional. Some are pencillers can be great at that too but it isn’t a given. I don’t know anything about this artist. But I think of colorist as collabrative artist that can focus on a pictorial problem that color itself poses for the scene and zero in oit enhacing the work, not just someone who gets notes dictated to them by the penciller and inker.

    >>So as far as respecting creative integrity goes, I think the version that actually involved the artist, asked for his feedback and got his approval is the one with greater integrity. I know it’s Marvel, but that doesn’t mean they automatically have less concern for the creators than Eclipse — it took Eclipse a while to figure out how best to present the material themselves, and they didn’t come out of the gate at 100%.>>

    I’d bet you a dollar that Alan Moore thinks this version sucks. And he seems to have great tastes in picking artists. Maybe a few guys on here can ask him to confirm. Its been sapped of its mood and been colorized to fit a MArvel fanboy fix. Perhaps the original coloring wasn’t all that amazing technique wise but it had the grit of the times in it from pages you shared, Starlog, Warrior, Heavy Metal era etc… that mood has been lost here (from what I’m seeing so far)

  19. johnrobiethecat says:

    p.s.

    ah, too much copyying & pasting, regrouping these to make sense.

    <>

    The adjustment there could have been making the acidic colors a bit more natural and tweaked more than recolored into what they do on a standard noir book.. The scene now just looks drained of any impact and closing up looks awkward and odd closeup as result. The hot colors in original whether intentional or not , convey the feverishness of the characters inner life more in the eye-shot page.Tthe putrid purple/gray colors of Marvel just are just tepid and makes the closeup seem drained of drama and odd as a result. You don’t see that?

  20. johnrobiethecat says:

    p.s.s.
    jeez, one more time…(looks like html earase if you use wrong syntax >>)

    >>The “eye close-up” is better now, to my mind, because it starts out bright and crisp and darkens, creating a transition to what follows, which is the intent of the page and which came across in black and white as black takes over the panels, but which the original coloring blew off, staying equally bright all the way through.>>

    The adjustment there could have been making the acidic colors a bit more natural and tweaked more than recolored into what they do on a standard noir book.. The scene now just looks drained of any impact and closing up looks awkward and odd closeup as result. The hot colors in original whether intentional or not , convey the feverishness of the characters inner life more in the eye-shot page.Tthe putrid purple/gray colors of Marvel just are just tepid and makes the closeup seem drained of drama and odd as a result. You don’t see that?

  21. jacob lyon goddard says:

    Makes me miss blue line coloring.

  22. Charles says:

    “I’d bet you a dollar that Alan Moore thinks this version sucks.”

    Alan Moore didn’t draw it, why does his opinion matter than Gary Leach’s?

  23. Kurt Busiek says:

    >> The colorist from the 80′s had the good fortune from being from that era with limited means so he had to be more resurceful and naturally in tune with material and times.>>

    The colorist from the 80s got a bad reaction to his choices even back in the 80s.

    >> Maybe its more the old version is more painterly than you prefer.>>

    “Painterly” is not a term I’d use to describe the old version. MIRACLEMAN got more painterly once they brought in Sean Parsons — who’s also the guy they got to fix the original take on the colors.

    >> A lot of pencillers don’t understand color to the point of a P. Craig Russell or Mike Mignola.>>

    Nor do a lot of colorists, including the guy who did the original pass for Eclipse.

    And now you’re simply imagining that Alan Moore must agree with you, but the fact that Garry Leach doesn’t agree with you is just dismissed as Garry Leach being ignorant about color.

    Of course, Moore was involved when they scrapped the initial colors the first time, too, so he can’t have liked them enough to defend them back then.

    >> Not to pick on JB but its an easy example when you look at what he’s colored himself at IDW.>>

    John’s colorblind. He doesn’t color himself at IDW, aside from some very limited spot-color jobs. What you seem to be saying is that you like Glynis’s coloring better than Ronda Pattison’s. Which is fine; Glynis was a very accomplished colorist, recognized widely for her skill.

    But that doesn’t mean Leach is also colorblind, or that a guy who had a low-level career for a few years in the 1980s is automatically Glynis.

    You might want to actually look at some of what Leach has painted or colored (including the Miracleman and Warrior covers he did) before you assume that he must not understand color because he didn’t like Eclipse’s colors for MIRACLEMAN, and wasn’t remotely alone in that.

    >> I’d bet you a dollar that Alan Moore thinks this version sucks. And he seems to have great tastes in picking artists.>>

    He didn’t pick the Eclipse colorist. He wasn’t consulted about that material either. He did pick (or was at least involved in picking) Garry Leach, whose color sense you’ve dismissed.

    >> Starlog, Warrior, Heavy Metal era etc… that mood has been lost here (from what I’m seeing so far)>>

    WARRIOR was a black-and-white magazine. STARLOG was a text magazine.

    The Eclipse MIRACLEMAN pages don’t look a thing like HEAVY METAL.

    kdb

  24. Kurt Busiek says:

    >> You don’t see that? >>

    No, I think it’s considerably more dramatic and suited to the story transition being made in the new version.

  25. Kurt Busiek says:

    >> looks like html earase if you use wrong syntax >>

    If you bracket them the way you were doing, it reads it as an HTML command and doesn’t show it on screen.

  26. I am being amused by someone suggesting that the guy who did Marvels with Alex Ross (and who has had Alex involved in Astro City for Years), Marvels: Eye of the Camera with Jay Anacleto, and The Wizard’s Tale with David Wenzel would find the coloring on the Eclipse Miracleman more “painterly” than he prefers.

    One thing to remember about the Eclipse comics: this was part of their attempt at a discount comics line, with cheaper printing being used on those earlier issues than what they commonly put forth.

  27. Whatever says:

    So marvel releases a book that has been out of print for the better part of 2 decades depriving at least one generation of a great comic; They consult the original writer accept his decision to remove his name and consult the original artists to produce a properly colored reprint and they are jerks? Really? Fuck me. I would have even given DC a pass on this, well maybe I am sure Jim Lee would have re-drawn everything and Morrison would rewrite Miracleman time traveling.

  28. johnrobiethecat says:

    >>I am being amused by someone suggesting that the guy who did Marvels with Alex Ross.(and who has had Alex involved in Astro City for Years), Marvels: Eye of the Camera with Jay Anacleto, and The Wizard’s Tale with David Wenzel would find the coloring on the Eclipse Miracleman more “painterly” than he prefers.>>

    I’m just looking at the pages linked to by @kdb here and seeing major recoloring changes in Marvelman that shifts the mood and confuses the focus of the panels. Whether thats precoius to story is something we might find out . If you don’t think mood is an important element and jazzed up graphics are your thing, it’ll probrably be OK enough to read. But it looks like they did recolor it in the current Marvel house style so they can have an Alan Moore bookin the Disney stable, which they’ll probrably never get by conventional means..

    It’s not too a big a deal to me but not a good sign either. The original work has been altered dramatically to suit a corporate taste. The original colorists have been dismissed as suitable enough to followed by a Marvel book. (Were they consulted?) It could be all Gary Leache’s doing, Who knows. It be interesting to hear if the original writer likes it or not.

    btw, “Painterly” can mean more than just brushwork, watercolor, wild strokesor or whatever Alex Ross does. It can also mean inverting colors and using tones and areas of color in a bold, unconventional way, You can look at the Fauves, Symbolosts and many Impressionists in Painting if you need a reference point outside of comics.

  29. johnrobiethecat says:

    >>So marvel releases a book that has been out of print for the better part of 2 decades depriving at least one generation of a great comic; They consult the original writer accept his decision to remove his name and consult the original artists to produce a properly colored reprint and they are jerks? Really? Fuck me. I would have even given DC a pass on this, well maybe I am sure Jim Lee would have re-drawn everything and Morrison would rewrite Miracleman time traveling.>>

    The same company with a legendary history of shafting original creators who works still bring them fortunes out of royalties and credit, that has like 5 X-Men books, 5 Avengers books, Wolverine in like 15 titles and loves to make an alternate universe so they can keep duplicating Kirby & Ditko characters in more books because they don’t have the creative reserves to make anything characters just as good in the last 30 years for their $3.99 and up merchandising catalogs. And on top that, act like they are the best in the biz now that Disney has their back. They want MiracleMan for a reason,. Nobody want to go back 10 or 20 yrs to recolor and rerelease a Bendis book.

  30. johnrobiethecat says:

    >> Starlog, Warrior, Heavy Metal era etc… that mood has been lost here (from what I’m seeing so far)>>
    ——–
    >>WARRIOR was a black-and-white magazine. STARLOG was a text magazine.
    The Eclipse MIRACLEMAN pages don’t look a thing like HEAVY METAL.>>
    —–

    @kdb
    ERA (from Wikipedia)
    An era is a period of time marked by distinctive character, events, changes on earth, etc.

    Not a simailar magazine to Warrior. Warrior was in comic book shops as a magazine featuring comics, often next to Starlog which was out at the time and Heavy Metal as well, Many in the same type of scifi/comic book shops that had a bit more variety. GrimJack, Blade Runner, American Flagg, John Sable, Star Wars…all part of an “era” in movies and comics and a cool one at that. That’s why it’s mined so much. Nobody is out there pining for the Youngblood days except those who got rich off of it.

  31. Whatever says:

    Johnrobiethecat this a classic case of you finding something to bitch about. All they are doing is releasing a book that a lot of people don’t have access too and yes make money. Call me when they release a Before Miracleman and I will match your outrage. Oh apologies “it’s not too big a deal to you” in 40,000 words or less, Christ over corporate coloring? WTF it’s like bizzaro world.

  32. >> I’m just looking at the pages linked to by @kdb here and seeing major recoloring changes in Marvelman that shifts the mood and confuses the focus of the panels.>>

    I’d say they shift the mood of the original color version, yes, but they bring it back to what it had been in black-and white. And they clarify the focus of the panels, again restoring what had been in the black and white originals.

    But never mind — what this has boiled down to is that you don’t like it, and you’re certainly allowed not to like it. My argument was against the idea that they were callously disregarding the artistic integrity of the piece by consulting with the original artist, accommodating the writer and in many ways duplicating the kind of changes that the original American publisher had made with the original creators’ approval back then.

    I think it’s clear that Marvel’s bending over backward, in this case, to try to honor and work with the creators and abide by their wishes (even, for instance, restoring the dedication that had run in WARRIOR but which Eclipse had deleted). If you don’t like the results, no sweat, but they’re certainly treating it with a great deal of care.

    I’d been worried they were going to replace the original lettering with some generic modern font, but even there, they had a font made from the original letterer’s work and are using that. A nice touch.

  33. Chip Mosher says:

    The re-lettering is super tasteful and kudos to Marvel for doing a great job on these page. I’ve read them too many times to count on first release and am very stoked to get this new series.

  34. John D says:

    Will there be a B&W collection down the road? I’d love to read the issues as they were originally produced in Warrior.

  35. Thanks guys, Now all I can think about is how much I want a magazine sized black and white Miricleman/Marvelman collection.

  36. Anyone who looks at what Kurt Busiek posted (http://mistahphil.tumblr.com/post/69617657544/miracleman-color-comparisons-from-left) and still says that this is a bad coloring job is crazy. The colors are much better in this new version. They’re toned down and less garish. It takes advantage of the new technology available.

    The only downside is that I think it would look better in black and white. If that was the original intent for the comic, then it should stay that way. Unless you redraw the comic, it shouldn’t be colored over. Jeff Smith had to redraw large parts of Bone to ‘colorize’ it for the same reasons.

  37. Matt Arado says:

    I’m excited about this project. Marvelman came out just before I was getting into comics, so I’ve never actually read it. But of course I’ve been HEARING about it for close to three decades now. I’m curious about whether the book will connect today, given that so much of what made it innovative (based, again, on what I’ve heard about it) has been used and re-used in comics so many times since. At the very least, it will be fascinating to experience a work from such an early point in Alan Moore’s career. I only wish Marvel was releasing this in trade form, rather than single-issue form. Has anyone heard about when trades of this run might be arriving?

  38. It cracks me up that there are people still interested in arguing with Kurt Busiek on the internet. He’s the most reasonable man alive, and he knows more than you do. Let it go. Walk away.

    Meanwhile, the tasteful coloring and lettering work have convinced me to pick this up as it comes out rather than waiting for the trade.

  39. johnrobiethecat says:

    >>It cracks me up that there are people still interested in arguing with Kurt Busiek on the internet. He’s the most reasonable man alive, and he knows more than you do. Let it go. Walk away.>>

    Ha, I never mind being schooled by @kdb . Though he kind of parsed a short comment I made at the beginning. I think it’s great a highly regarded professional jumps in the wild mix here and methodically demonstrates his points. (like Brubaker & few other guys too) But we’re not at Comic Con , I see the pages and give an assessment of before and after from the pages provided. It had some good color ideas in the Eclipse recoloring but kdb clarified Gary Leach original lt did it in b& w and had no say in the recoloring, So if that’s the case. maybe its better to go by Leach’s judgement. since this will be the final-ish version of perhaps his most famous work via Marvel. He looks like a good artist and I ‘m really interested in this series since it has a lore and the writer behind it. At least, issues 1-3. Everything is so manufactured ans slick now that I didn’t mind the raw qualities of the original.

  40. >> Will there be a B&W collection down the road? I’d love to read the issues as they were originally produced in Warrior.>>

    So much of the run was originally done in color, probably not. Eclipse ran out of material from WARRIOR early in #6.

    And even if someone did collect all the pages that had been first published in black-and-white into a book, it’d end of a hell of a cliffhanger…

  41. Stephen B says:

    I came to this site over a year ago when finding articles about A. Moore and his interviews.

    And there are many such articles. Now, Fall 2013 there was word that (as we never thought we’d see) MARVELMAN series are being reprinted. And there is a collection in hardback listed A DREAM OF FLYING out probably in May 2014!

    I appreciate everyone with comments, and notes here, even with very diverse opinions there are fans who have hopes there are still a few good comics to expect and classic-era work from Alan ‘The Original Writer’ Moore and others we want to own and have on the shelf to read again.

  42. Bardo Ambriz says:

    I am seriously looking forward to these books, I’ve read a lot of the issues online but I’m pretty sure I was missing something visually, here’s hoping for a feast for the eyes

  43. Alan Smith says:

    Personally I find there’s always a clash, sometimes subtle, sometimes glaring, between modern computer colouring, and old pre digital artwork. Having grown up pre digital with its analogue colour, I nearly always find that pre digital art recoloured looks weird. I can’t always put my finger on it but it’s there. The extra modelling layers. The weak background colours. I’m generally with JohnRobie…pre digital colour choices were bolder, fewer choices led to more striking choices. Now there’s a billion colours they play it safer often. I’ve resigned myself to this.

    Don’t even get me started on ben day dotted stuff recoloured without the dots (like the current egregious Swamp Thing reprints). I think there’s whole swathes of stuff thats irreparably damaged by modern colouring. On the basis of a few panels this Miracleman job isn’t the worst ever. They’re certainly trying really hard to get it right.

    There’s a good article here on recoloured BWS Conan’s which I hope adds something. Bad recolouring reducing the impact of the storytelling. http://comicsalliance.com/whatever-happened-to-barry-windsor-smith-in-the-comics-conversation/

  44. Alan Smith says:

    For the record (based on these panels) I would choose the third pages…is that the Eclipse recolours? A slight luridness is part of the appeal of reading old comics surely, and there’s a bold directness the latest ones have weakened, especially in background colour choices, page 2 particularly.

    For me.

  45. Oliver says:

    Colorizing is still colorizing, however skillfully done. The ‘Warrior’ pages were intended for magazine format in black-and-white — a loss of size plus overlaid colour can only obscure all the careful cross-hatching, textures and zip-a-tone by Leach and Davis. And don’t get me started on the bowdlerization of Liz’s nudity and Evelyn Cream’s dialogue.

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