New book by webcartoonists tells you how to live well on less money

poorx inset community New book by webcartoonists tells you how to live well on less money

Sign o’ the times? Of COURSE a webcomicker wrote a book on living well frugally. Spike “Templar, AZ” Trotman wrote and Diana Nock illustrated POORCRAFT, which was funded on Kickstarter (in 2009!) of course.

Poorcraft follows a young woman (“Penny”) who has mastered “the fine art of living well on less.” Each chapter includes Penny’s tips on how to make a budget and spend it wisely on housing, food, education, entertainment and the like.

Poorcraft bills itself as “the essential comic book guide to practical urban and suburban frugality.” It’s on sale now for $10, and publisher (Iron Circus Comics) offers an excerpt on its site.


That preview is located here. Here’s a sample page:
poorcraft promo 00003 New book by webcartoonists tells you how to live well on less money
Okay, I’m pretty sure 99% of us need this book. Your copy is only $10!

Comments

  1. I’m a budget geek and one thrifty guy. You’d be surprised how much money you can waste on the daily crap we take for granted. Do the math on how much you spend on lunches, coffees, etc. during the work week, or those splurges when you reach for a credit or debit card. Saving is hard but toally worth it. You enjoy what you have more and you spend less money and time trying to buy happiness.

  2. If owning a house means I have to make myself a turkey sandwich every day instead of buying it at Pret a Manger then…I’ll die in a shanty.

  3. Chris Hero says:

    NYCers have unique challenges the rest of the country doesn’t have. In the rest of the US, driving to the grocery store to stock up on food is really, really easy. In NYC, it seems like eating out is almost a necessity because where do you guys grocery shop?

    I feel like there almost has to be a “here’s how to be budget conscious in the non-NYC US” and “here’s how to be budget conscious in NYC.”

    It looks like a great book, though. I’m always amazed how I can keep on buying stocks with no problems but my friends are desperately trying to afford to live. And we all make relatively the same. Money management is a skill more people need.

  4. I just ordered a copy of this for a friend who last week called me from the restaurant where he was eating lunch, asking to lend him money for his rent because he’d just paid for installation of satellite TV (because he owes a couple hundred bucks each to Comcast and AT&T).

    I’ve been unemployed/underemployed/student for most of my adult life, so doing things to save nickels is second-nature to me. My boyfriend used to call me “the youngest person who grew up during the Great Depression”.

  5. Of course one of the things that hard times teaches you is to try and buy stuff used. Trouble is saying no to all the cool old irresistable crap you find at thrift stores (records, toys, t-shirts, whatever). :/

  6. Johnny Memeonic says:

    An adult should not need a book like this. Basic money concepts are common sense.

    But if anyone does need this book I also recommend researching how to invest and grow wealth in stocks and investments with a portion of your budget. The internet has made learning this easier than at any point in history.

    By the time you’re done you’ll know too much about economics to ever be able to vote democrat again, but at least you’ll have some money when you get old.

  7. @ Johnny Memeonic: I respectfully disagree. Like anything else budgeting is a life-skill that most people don’t necessarily have, otherwise credit card debt would be non-existant and we’d all be living happily according to our income levels. Most people get their money skills from their parents, which, depending on what their skills are, may not be the best source. It’s never too late to learn or better your knowledge on responsibly managing your money.

  8. Saber Tooth Tiger Mike says:

    “But if anyone does need this book I also recommend researching how to invest and grow wealth in stocks and investments with a portion of your budget. The internet has made learning this easier than at any point in history.

    By the time you’re done you’ll know too much about economics to ever be able to vote democrat again, but at least you’ll have some money when you get old.”

    The problem with money management is cultural. People do not want to live within their means because being perceived as poor is socially undesirable, particularly for men. Part of the reason why the housing bubble happened and why all kinds of personal and government debt is high is due to a sense of entitlement.

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