Quick hits

§ Revolving door: Rick Marshall has joined MTV’s Splash page blog:

I’ll be joining the current editor, Casey Seijas, in helping to make this new spin-off from their already successful MTV Movies site an even more attractive online destination for comics and movie fans. It’s a lofty goal, though, as Casey and the Splash Page crew have been doing a great job on the site since it launched in late July. If you haven’t done so already, I hope you’ll bookmark Splash Page and subscribe to the Splash Page RSS Feed. As always, I’ll do my best to reward your support with the most interesting content I can provide.

§ Reporter Van Jensen has joined the Top Shelf brotherhood of the traveling pants.

§ Just a nice one: a profile of 88-year-old former Timely artist Marion Sitton:

Marion Sitton sat mum as Stan Lee looked over his artwork. Sitton studied the future Spider-Man creator’s face as he took in the OK Corral scene Sitton had completed the previous week.

Lee praised the authentic-looking boots and other lifelike features of his cowboys.

“You can draw,” he said, “I’ll give you that.”

Those words granted Sitton membership in 1948 into Timely Comics’ artists bullpen. During the next six years, he was one of dozens of artists at Timely, later renamed Marvel, who drew dueling cowboys, fedora-wearing mystery men and embracing lovers. Superheroes were not in his repertoire.

Comments

  1. Great piece on Marion Sitton. If his health permits, it would be wonderful to have Mr. Sitton as an honored guest at a convention!

  2. He was born in 1920? Did he do any illustrations for the pulp magazines?

  3. It’s not as uncomfortable as you might think to have one leg on each side of the fence…

    And congrats to Rick.

  4. Annie Sitton says:

    I know Marion. You should know that he also has claimed to family members that he created Borden’s Elsie the Cow (which he did not…Google her.) He has claimed to have invented things for which he’s not the inventor. For years he has had cartoons photocopied in washed out tones, then he inked and colored them, and signed them. We have some of them and consider them as forgeries. Most, if not all, of his Bio that is in publication and on the internet is self reported.

    He began by telling the family that he was an inker for Stan Lee, then in his stories he promoted himself to “original artist.” So who knows what the truth might be.

    And did I mention: only a long-lost elderly family member could have conned us out of so much money.

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