On the Scene: Celebrating Golden Age Comics at Columbia University

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TweetOn January 23rd, Columbia University Library acquired a double-bill of Golden Age related comics materials, including the research materials Larry Tye compiled to write his Superman biography, The High Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero, and six 1940’s BATMAN scripts from the estate of Jerry Robinson. These add to the ongoing Rare Book and […]

Columbia University acquires the Elfquest archives

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As Dave Sim noted the other day, Wendy and Richard Pini, creators of Elfquest, the pioneering indie comics fantasy, held on to all of their artwork. And now they are bequeathing it to Columbia University’s archives. The PR below explains all you need to know, but we should note that Columbia’s tireless librarian and comics-scholar Karen Green has been busy indeed.

ELFQUEST to be on iPad/iPhone?

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It’s funny how something that has been around forever can still get a blog boost — as we reported yesterday, some 6500 pages of ELFQUEST comics are online, to read, for FREE — but they have been up for more than two years. Our post got Boing Boinged, and Richard Pini, WARP graphics co-everything, wrote in to answer some questions in that thread, especially complaints about the Flash interface (one wag posted a link to the complete Elfquest on a bit torrent site.)

First, thanks for putting this “old news” back in the news.

The online library: The Complete ELFQUEST

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Speaking of fantasy, one of the pillars of the fantasy comics genres is now available in its entirety to read online. ELFQUEST, Wendy and Richard Pini’s saga of homeless elves and their passions and battles, first published in 1978, was one of the foundational hits of the emerging indie comics scene, and after many publishers, movie options and assorted dramas, it’s still a good story.