MAD MENTAL CRAZY! The True Life of the Fabulous Zenith, Part 3

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TweetWelcome to crunch time. In this final instalment of MAD MENTAL CRAZY! things come to a head, so I highly recommend catching up with Part 1 and Part 2 and meeting me back here in a minute!

MAD MENTAL CRAZY! The True Life of the Fabulous Zenith, Part 2

Mad Mental Crazy!

TweetLast week I began my in-depth look at the history of Zenith and its attached legal dispute. As before I shall add my disclaimer: that this in no way speculates on who is right and who is wrong, and that it seeks only to bring you the facts, histories and quotes at my disposal – […]

MAD MENTAL CRAZY! The True Life of the Fabulous Zenith

MAD MENTAL CRAZY!

Tweet  Once upon a time there was a comic strip named Zenith. The creators created, the publishers published, but not a contract was there to be found. 21 years later, Rebellion are going to the printers – but who owns what?

Stripped Book Fest Line-Up Announced

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TweetThe Edinburgh Book Festival, held annually in Scotland’s capital city every August, is the biggest public book festival in the world. This year it includes a brand new strand, Stripped, celebrating the world of comics with one hell of a stonking guest list including Grant Morrison and Neil Gaiman.

Zenith by Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell is Back!

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TweetOnce more, I’ve dragged myself away from my usual obsessive witterings about Marvelman to write about another, different, long-lost British superhero. Right now, as you’re reading this, the Internet is about to explode/has already exploded with the news that Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell’s Zenith is finally being reprinted by British publishing company Rebellion. Zenith […]

Is Grant Morrison’s Zenith going to return?

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At last weekend’s C2E2 the Rebellion/2000 AD crowd was out and represented by marketing man about town Michael Molcher. Snapping a pic of him and his fellow boothworkers you could not help but notice that they were wearing T-shirs baring the logo of Zenith, which is, after Marvelman, perhaps the greatest “lost” superhero of UK comics. Created by Grant Morrison and Steve Yeowell, with original character designs by Brendan McCarthy , it first appeared in in 2000 AD #535 in August 1987, and ran for four story arcs, or ‘phases,’ which finished up in 2000 AD #805 in October 1992. It ran in about 80 issues of the comic; the first three phases were collected in five volumes by Titan Books between 1988 and 1990. Phase Four has never been reprinted.

Review: Action Comics, the Grant Morrison Edition

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TweetGrant Morrison’s run on Action Comics has been met with both high praise and no small measure of bewilderment. But this is a legendary run – you just need to think five dimensionally.

INTERVIEW: R.M. Peaslee and R.G. Weiner Deconstruct Spider-Man in WEB-SPINNING HEROICS

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TweetSpider-Man is hands down one of the most popular characters ever to leap from the pages of Marvel Comics, and is even a strong contender for one of the most popular comic characters produced by any comics publisher. He’s also displayed a particular trademark flexibility in successfully taking to the silver screen and flourishing through […]

Review: Batman Incorporated #8 – The Boy Wonder Returns

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Tweet(Spoilers!) Well, we can’t say that we didn’t know it was coming. From early on in the run, Grant Morrison has said in interviews and at convention appearances that his six year Batman run would end in heartbreak.

Review: Completely Happy!

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TweetThe concluding issue of Grant Morrison and Darick Robertson’s Happy! has finally made its way to the shelves, and has seemingly divided critics right down the middle. It’s perhaps no surprise to anyone who has seen my Happy earrings that I loved it, but let’s have a proper look…

Morrison v Moore — the Comics Version

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Via Millarworld — in case you have been sleeping and missed Grant Morrison’s thoughts on Alan Moore. We don’t know the credits for this, but it’s pretty awesome.

The Strange Case of Grant Morrison and Alan Moore, As Told By Grant Morrison

Photo Used in Drivel Column

by Laura Sneddon–Over the last few weeks, my good friend Pádraig Ó Méalóid has been writing a series of articles about Alan Moore and Superfolks, which became an edgeways look at the long running friction between Moore and fellow writer, Grant Morrison. While Moore has previously spoken out about his thoughts on Morrison in various interviews, Morrison has generally kept quiet on the issue. There have been occasional barbs of course, and plenty of praise, but very little on the actual facts of the matter.

Alan Moore and Superfolks Part 2: The Case for the Defence

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So, just to recap where we left off last time: it looks like Alan Moore has based all the big hits of his career on ideas he stole from Robert Mayer’s 1977 novel Superfolks. Various people, including Grant Morrison, Kurt Busiek, Lance Parkin, Joseph Gualtieri, and even Robert Mayer himself, have claimed at one point or another that Moore based a lot of his superhero work on various aspects of the book, specifically Marvelman, Watchmen, Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, and his proposal to DC Comics for the unpublished cross-company ‘event,’ Twilight of the Superheroes. But is any of this true, or might there be another explanation? To answer that, I’m going to go through the individual allegations or suggestions, and deal them one by one, to see how they hold up.

Alan Moore and Superfolks Part 1: The Case for the Prosecution

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In 1977 Dial Press of New York published Robert Mayer’s first novel, Superfolks. It was, amongst other things, a story of a middle-aged man coming to terms with his life, an enormous collection of 1970s pop-culture references, some now lost to the mists of time, and a satire on certain aspects of the comic superhero, but would probably be largely unheard of these days if it wasn’t for the fact that it is regularly mentioned for its supposed influence on a young Alan Moore and his work, particularly on Watchmen, Marvelman, and his Superman story, Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? There’s also a suggestion that it had an influence on his proposal to DC Comics for the unpublished cross-company ‘event,’ Twilight of the Superheroes. But who’s saying these things, what are they saying, and is any of it actually true?

Grant Morrison, MBE

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Grant Morrison models his Member of the British Empire medal which he was just presented with. And no, you cannot call him Sir Grant, as that honorific only comes with the two highest orders of the British empire.

NYCC in audio with Morrison, Ennis, etc.

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TweetJamie Coville recording a bunch of panels from New York Comic Con and here they are for you listening pleasure: New York Comic Con 2012 (October 11 – 14) – 126 Photos