REVIEW: “Do I Really Want My Name Associated with SEX AND VIOLENCE?”

ploregon

by LTZ A while back, the Beat’s own Henry Barajas – tireless observer of Kickstarted comics that he is – took some time to preview a crowd-funded book by Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti, Jimmy Broxton, and Juan Santacruz. Sex and Violence, Vol. 1 was laid bare (spread-eagle, perhaps) to its supporters this past week, after […]

Review: CREATOR-OWNED HEROES #8 and BLACK BEETLE #1

22592

[warning: mild spoilers ahead for CREATOR-OWNED HEROES #8 and major spoilers ahead for BLACK BEETLE #1] Well, here it is. The final issue of CREATOR-OWNED HEROES. When you think “last issue”, particularly on a series meeting an untimely end, you might expect the rough edges left behind by a team just going through the motions […]

Creator Owned Heroes #7: A Penultimate Review

COH-1

Earlier this week, Jimmy Palmiotti announced that the noble experiment CREATOR OWNED HEROES would conclude after its 8th issue. Over the course of the magazine’s publication, outreach on social media emphasized the need to raise awareness and increase solicitation from comic shops to keep the multi-contributor series in motion. Consistently strong reviews appeared on media, […]

Kick-Watcher: INTERVIEW with Jimmy Palmiotti on SEX AND VIOLENCE Vol. 1

pornland cover

Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray debut their second Kickstarter project of the year, SEX AND VIOLENCE Volume One.

Frankenstorm Reading: Weathering the Evacuation Blues

IMG_2261

On Sunday, I went out and got groceries from the already Walking Dead-like store with its empty shelves and zombie walkers and then I stashed everything that could be blown around outside my house, causing damage. Then I settled in for some 30 Rock on demand and snatched some Halloween candy from the pile, getting […]

Palmiotti, Gray and Ordway launch DC's Human Bomb

beat-default

By Steve Morris Suspiciously, DC have today announced on CBR that writers Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti and artist Jerry Ordway will be the creative team for a four-issue ‘Human Bomb’ miniseries. Why suspiciously? Because this follows two previous miniseries by the writers, which also starred members of DC’s Freedom Fighters team. SUSPICIOUS WORK IS AFOOT!

SDCC: Kickstarter Changes Comics

beat-default

By Alexander Añé Saturday afternoon Jimmy Palmiotti introduced the panelists, Cindy Au, Vijaya Iver, and Batton Lash, for Kickstarter Changes Comics. Paul Levitz was originally to introduce the panel but he was not in attendance and so Jimmy carried the show more than well enough. The premise for the panel is to help instruct potential […]

Monolith finally gets a trade…from Image

beat-default

For years, writers Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray have been running a “Get MONOLITH A Trade!” campaign to get their 12-issue maxiseries from 2004 a collection. Although the book had a dedicated following—especially for fans of Phil Winslade’s amazing art—given that its sales were modest, that wasn’t the most likely outcome. However, on Facebook it’s revealed that rights have finally reverted and a collection is in the works from Image. Or rather—two collections, both in an oversized European hardcover album, like The Pro deluxe hardcover.

The WildStorm Legacy

beat-default

With the announcement of the closure of WildStorm imprint at DC and the retiring of the WildStorm name, it isn’t just another in a long list of comics imprints that have ended over the years. In its 18 year run WildStorm has been a vital part of several revolutions in commercial comics, and changed the game in many ways — Rob Liefeld’s post below gives a succinet run down of some of the highlights.

Founded by Jim Lee as one of the original six Image Studios (along with Marc Sillvestri’s Top Cow, Todd McFarlane’s McFarlane Productions, Rob Liefeld’s Extreme Studios, Jim Valentino’s ShadowLine and Erik Larsen’s Highbrow Entertainment), WildStorm immediately established itself as one of the most commercial, with huge sellers like WildCATS and Gen 13. A series of developing fan favorite artists, including of course Lee himself, but also J. Scott Campbell, Joe Madureira and Humberto Ramos, kept popularity up, while the creator owned Homage imprint delivered such strong properties as Astro City and Leave it To Chance.

Although known first for their art, by the end of the decade, WildStorm was really becoming known for some of the most daring mainstream writing of the period, with genre-defining work by Warren Ellis and Mark Millar, strong adventure material by Jimmy Palmiotti and Ed Brubaker, as well as daring experiments like Automatic Kafka, a book by Joe Casey and Ashley Wood that people are still figuring out.

And then there was America’s Best Comics, an new line of comics written by Alan Moore that would introduce the world to League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Tom Strong, Promethea and Top Ten, the superhero police procedural. And our favorite, Jack B. Quick, the boy inventor who solved science’s greatest non problems.

Of course, there are dark parts to the legacy as well, all of which will be trotted out and discussed at length, we’re sure. But for now, we asked creators and staff for some of their good memories, and this is what they came back with.