Adrian Tomine covers The New Yorker with 9/11 Memorial

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Tweet This week’s New Yorker has a cover by Adrian Tomine, and he discusses it inside the magazine: “When I heard that the 9/11 memorial and museum were going to be the top tourist attractions in New York this summer,” Adrian Tomine says about this week’s cover, “I first sketched only tourists going about their […]

Exclusive: Boom announces more of Shannon Wheeler’s cartoons in I DON’T GET IT

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Tweet You’ve got to be pretty funny when your rejected cartoons win an Eisner, but that’s what happened to Shannon Wheeler (Too Much Coffee Man) with I Thought You Would Be Funnier, a collection of his cartoons—including many rejected by The New Yorker—which won an Eisner for Best Humor Publication in 2011. Well, there’s more […]

On the Scene: Denver Comic Con 2013, Life as a Moving Picture in Chris Ware’s Keynote

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TweetWilliam Kuskin, Ph.D., of the University of Colorado, Boulder, introduced Denver Comic Con’s keynote speaker, cartoonist Chris Ware, as a man who presents “honesty” as an “antidote to the emptiness we see in culture now, countered by art, even if he evokes a nightmare through that honesty”. Ware guided the audience at DCC through the […]

Françoise Mouly launches Blown Covers blog

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On the “authority” scale, the idea of New Yorker cover editor Françoise Mouly launching a blog about New Yorker covers and art would rank….very high. And so Blown Covers, which she describes as a personal blog. Although it’s unafiliated with the New Yorker, she’s holding weekly themed New Yorker cover contests and is “always on the lookout for good ideas and great artists.” So yeah, this is an audition.

We Can’t All Be ‘Funny’

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BY JEN VAUGHN – Cartoonist James Sturm wrote an insightful piece on submitting cartoons to the New Yorker posted on The Slate. As a cartoonist or unfortunately termed ‘graphic novelist,’ Sturm is used to drawing stories in the long term, stretching a few hundred pages, panel upon panel upon panel upon YES, panel. How Sturm spent his summer vacation was a cartoon a day to build up a keeper-portfolio for The New Yorker. Sturm relearned to let go of the beats you find in a long-form comic to sketch loosely and effectively situations right after that something funny, something intangible occurred. He includes many of his cartoons in the article including this close-to-home joke and one of my favorites, when the caption is recycled for a different situation.