Todd Klein's new print features art by Steve Rude

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Lettering lord Todd Klein has not only won more awards for lettering than any other living human, he’s created six striking limited edition prints in collaboration with Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Alex Ross, J.H. Williams III, Mark Buckingham and Bill WIllingham all of which are available on his site. . All the prints feature Klein’s masterful lettering with original words or art by his collaborators, each with a rough alphabetical theme.

He’s just announced a SEVENTH print, this time in conjunction with Steve Rude, entitled “Hope” and depicting Pandora.

Pandora has just opened a box she was not supposed to open, releasing a swarm of Troubles into the world. Last to emerge is the spirit of Hope. In text from the retelling of the myth by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Hope says, “I was packed into the box to make amends to the human race for that swarm of ugly Troubles, which was destined to be let loose among them. Never fear! We shall do pretty well in spite of them all.”


The text includes the Hawthonre quote and part of a poem by Emily Dickinson.

The prints go on sale on June 1, signed by both Klein and Rude. The price is $20 but Klein is donating $2 from each sale to the American Red Cross — so you get to help some folks, as well.

And yes, Todd tells us, the letter “G” is coming.

Comments

  1. Wow- another beauty! I really have to get more walls so I can put these all up.

  2. That’s so beautiful. And these prints make great gifts also!

  3. pulphope says:

    It is impossible for Steve Rude to do bad work. The print looks great.

  4. Steve Rude is still great. Why is he having money troubles? He should be one of the most well paid and successful comic artists of all time. Seems strange to me.

  5. @PD Houston: Rude is not the fastest artist around, he’s had a rough go at self-publishing, and perceived bad experiences at the Big Two have soured him on more mainstream work. When you can’t churn out piles of work, when you don’t have the business savvy (or the financial wherewithal) to make a reasonable return on what you do create, and when you’re constitutionally opposed to seeking more profitable arrangements… well, money problems tend to ensue.

    I’m not saying he’s wrong to have gone the direction he did. A lot of guys in his situation chased the dream just as he did, most without what seemed to be a proven indie property ready to pass through presses on day one, almost certainly guaranteeing at least a certain level of success. It’s still shocking to see just how thoroughly his dream turned him into the anti-Mignola (to use one comparison) when he seemed so well-positioned to do at least as well as the guy whose flipside he instead became.

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