Valiant Tease The Original Quantum and Woody Team

It looks like the week prior to ‘NYCC’ has become the new ‘NYCC’, as Valiant have just sent out a teaser image suggesting that they’re going to be doing something with the original Quantum & Woody team. Are they referring to the characters, or to the creative team of Christopher Priest and Mark Bright, with whom the characters are indelibly associated with?

NYCC_WORLDS_WORST_redux

Valiant have a panel at NYCC on Saturday, so I guess we’ll have to find out then.

Comments

  1. Carlton says:

    Guys, Valiant is a singular entity … so you should say “Valiant HAS a panel at NYCC …” Hate to be a grammar cop, but you guys do this all the time.

  2. Ahhh BUT this is a panel made up of several people, and the “have” refers to that group of people, who are representing Valiant.

    Which may still not really be a great excuse, but I never cared much for rules of grammar an’ all tha’

  3. Carlton says:

    That doesn’t excuse the “as Valiant have just sent…” in the first paragraph and the “Valiant have…” in the last sentence. This site always does this in reference to singular entities, and it’s not correct.

  4. Valiant are not a singular entity. Valiant are a mystical collective. Valiant are legion.

  5. Silly But True says:

    Priest. It’s been too long since you were writing something I can buy monthly on the shelves.

    Let’s get to it, then. I’ve got money to spend.

    Next up, a New52 Xer0 mini-series with CrissCross.

    Silly But True

  6. Johnny Memeonic says:

    Guys, Valiant is a singular entity … so you should say “Valiant HAS a panel at NYCC …” Hate to be a grammar cop, but you guys do this all the time.

    Treating company names as plural instead of singular is a difference between British and American English. Now consider who wrote the article.

    On a side note, in comics little stuff like that always takes me out of the story for a second and reminds me when American characters I’m reading are being written by British authors. One of the most common things is when they have a character say they’re going to “hospital” instead of “the hospital” or “full stop” instead of “period.”

  7. @Johnny: It’s a common form of speech in America but no, it’s not correct. Collective nouns are still singular. Carlton’s right — “Valiant have” is a common, easily recognized and understandable form, but it’s not correct English.
    Regarding British writers using British English: Grant Morrison used “aircon” in Batman Inc several times. And China Mieville had a bit in Dial H where Nelson kept referring to the dial as “bust”, “not “busted”.

  8. On-topic: even if it’s just that Valiant’s finally releasing the finished-but-unpublished issues of the original Q&W, I’ll take it. But I’d much rather have something new from Priest and Bright, Q&W or otherwise.

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