WB head: “We need to get Wonder Woman on the big screen or TV”

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201310071323 WB head: We need to get Wonder Woman on the big screen or TV
I know some of you are sick of our stalking newish WB CEO Kevin Tsujihara, but he’s still in that honeymoon phase where everything he says or does is subject to Kremlinologist analysis. This weekend at a keynote address at the USC Gould School of Law, Tsujihara opened up about the departure of Legendary, the return of JK Rowling, and reaffirmed the importance of DC Comics. He said it was a “missed opportunity” not to develop franchises outside the Superman/Batman axis and confirmed “huge plans for a number of other DC properties on TV.” And then the sweet sweet music that many had been longing for: “We need to get Wonder Woman on the big screen or TV.”

Now of course, this comes after two proposed versions of the Amazon for TV—David Kelley’s Ally McAmazon take and Alan Heinberg’s Amazon—were rejected by networks. But at least Tsujihara—who ran the division that put out the animated Wonder Woman direct-to-DVD movie that is still her finest multi-media representation since the 70s TV show—didn’t waffle with talk about bondage and swimsuits and bad origins and the kinks of a guy who died nearly seventy years ago. That’s a start.

Comments

  1. Rich Harvey says:

    “… didn’t waffle with talk about bondage and swimsuits and bad origins and the kinks of a guy who died nearly seventy years ago.

    That’s good. Hopefully he doesn’t waffle on discussing what makes for a good Wonder Woman project.

  2. Synsidar says:

    Hopefully he doesn’t waffle on discussing what makes for a good Wonder Woman project.

    Who do you think that a Wonder Woman movie or series should be aimed at? The sex and age range of the target audience would impact the choice of story material a lot,

    Fans of the comic book Wonder Woman tend to assume that elements such as Steve Trevor and Diana Prince as a secret identity would be great in a series, but they’re actually severe restrictions, like assuming that a Superman story will have him at the Daily Planet, with Jimmy Olsen as his buddy, Lois Lane as his girlfriend, etc. People need to be creative with their ideas.

    SRS

  3. In the immortal words of Buffy Anne Summers…Add it up, it all spells “Duh!”

  4. Nick Jones says:

    “the animated Wonder Woman direct-to-DVD movie that is still her finest multi-media representation since the 70s TV show”

    I heartily disagree. That movie had so little faith in the title character that it treated Wonder Woman as an ensemble player alongside the story-driving Steve Trevor, with large amounts of time also diverted to Ares and a bunch of random Amazons. Justice League/Justice League Unlimited, series where you would expect a lack of focus on her due to the size of the cast, treated Wonder Woman far better.

  5. I think modern audiences could do without Steve Trevor, but some sort of support characters are needed. For some time the comics’ Wonder Woman has lacked a support-cast that reinforces her “wonderfulness.” But more importantly, any new adaptation of the Amazon would have to get away from that “plaster saint” attitude that has dominated most incarnations. To some extent it’s even influenced other media versions, and the only cure for that is to come up with a more vital characterization.

  6. Snikt Snakt says:

    They should pair up WW with Aquaman, since neither seems to get much respect these days…

  7. ” reaffirmed the importance of DC Comics…”

    Considering the continuing redundancy of his comments, this sounds more like a subliminal ‘cry for help’ than a real commitment to the integrity of the company’s IPs.

  8. whatever says:

    This is funny I laughed. The animated movie was I think the worst selling of the animated DC movies. This is a ridiculously flawed and stupid character but it will be immensely enjoyably to watch WB try and field it.

  9. Serhend Sirkecioglu says:

    If they did a live action Wonder Woman film, I can see it being interesting if they approached the origin film as a sword and sandal movie, pretty much Clash of the Titans with Gina Carano. I can also see how they could botch this if they get too Soap-Boxy and Elysium/Prometheus it. just if they do make one and have a subsequent animated series can they expand the DC Nation block to three shows instead of cancelling a show.

  10. Rich Harvey says:

    “Who do you think that a Wonder Woman movie or series should be aimed at? The sex and age range of the target audience would impact the choice of story material a lot,”

    I’m not interested in Charles Moulton’s sex life, if that’s what you mean. Hopefully this Warner guy, Kevin Tsujihara, can focus on Wonder Woman, and not the non-topics mentioned in the above article.

  11. Chris Duffy says:

    I don’t know…to me Wonder Woman is most interesting in the 40s. I LIKE her origin story AND the story of the character’s creation by a guy with a unique lifestyle and point of view. He was a little kinky and weird, but did he hurt anyone? Good luck to the TV and movie people but I doubt they’ll make anything as interesting as Les Daniels’ book about WW and Moulton.

Trackbacks

  1. […] NEWS: Kevin Tsujihara just said that to the press that he wants to get Wonder Woman on screen. I know you’re a big Wonder Woman fan. But from your reaction just now, I’m guessing […]

  2. […] WB head: “We need to get Wonder Woman on the big screen or TV” (comicsbeat.com) […]

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