We’re not just imagining these things, you know

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Old Disney Rejection Letter via Boing Boing.

UPDATE: to those who thought this was not a form letter — nope, it was SOP.

Comments

  1. Brian Spence says:

    That’s so outrageous it almost looks fake. And it was written by a woman, too. (I’m assuming it was written by someone named Mary, unless I’m reading that signature wrong.)

  2. To add insult to insult…

    The squirrel and bunny may look cute, but they’re actually laughing at Snow White because Uncle Walt would only let her be a tracer.

  3. That’s so outrageous it almost looks fake. And it was written by a woman, too.

    Well, let’s give the letter writer a pass. You might read this as “We don’t want your kind around here,” but to my eye the letter very much reads as an experienced elder giving the young hopeful from Arkansas a stiff but not unkind reality check before she does something regrettable.

    This is obviously not a form letter or typical rejection from Walt Disney Productions. If it were, i believe the language would be much more neutral, and it wouldn’t include suggestions as to how to actually accomplish the wannabe’s goal (cf. the last paragraph). The writer takes a moment to explain the situation on the ground.

    (i can’t imagine that a man in the same position as the letter writer would have even been able to write this letter.)

  4. Wow. Grisly.
    As pointed out elsewhere, ink and paint may have been considered the only position suitable for women, but it was a highly skilled one, and crucial. Imagine what a sloppy inker or tracer could do to a film.
    I’ve done ink and paint (at a studio with two fellas who founded DNA, makers of The Ant Bully).
    Ink and Paint is surprisingly dull and yet so important.

    And, as Heidi says, we’re not just imagining this. We never were.

  5. If it were, i believe the language would be much more neutral, and it wouldn’t include suggestions as to how to actually accomplish the wannabe’s goal (cf. the last paragraph).

    The problem is, Skipper, is that the letter DOES NOT explain to the young woman how to accompish her goal — being involved in the creative part.

    It’s instructions on how to go play in the sand box the MEN have so very kindly and generously deigned to let the women into.

    The language is as kind in tone as possible but the underlying message is 100% Woman != Man.

  6. I don’t think anyone thinks you are imagining sexism in 1938. Women had only been voting for 18 years. Look how far things have come since then and smile :)

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